Battery devices, carry spare batteries

When using a battery powered device, it's important to have a set of replacement batteries at hand. My digicam and minimag both take two AA cells, so I've got spares there. I've had moments when the camera went dead. So, I swapped the batteries, and kept taking pictures.
One time when I was helping with set up at the museum, I decided to see how long they lasted. Instead of put a new set in, one day I decided to see if yesterday's batteries would make it through a second day. Had a couple bars on the power indicator. We were running wiring, and I was transmitting often, keeping in contact with the other people. Day two, the batteries went dead. I was on the third floor, there was no elevator, and I got to walk down to the van to get a change of batteries.
After that, I kept a second set spare batteries in my coat pocket.
The concept works for flashlights, GPS, cordless drills, etc. Have a spare set with you.
Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus www.lds.org .
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On Oct 3, 7:32 am, "Stormin Mormon"

If non-rechargeable batteries DO NOT test them; if you plan on keeping them stored for later use.
It is my understanding that a chemical process starts up when a battery is used that then causes it to self discharge fairly rapidly compared to simply putting on a shelf until you need them. Difference is not getting a 5 year shelf life but getting a shelf life as short as 1, or even 1/2 year, life -- if you 'tested' them under full load for a bit.
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I've never heard this. Was this something you heard in person, or read on the net? I'd like to see that, if you can find it on the web. May just save my batteries, over the period of time.
Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus www.lds.org .
If non-rechargeable batteries DO NOT test them; if you plan on keeping them stored for later use.
It is my understanding that a chemical process starts up when a battery is used that then causes it to self discharge fairly rapidly compared to simply putting on a shelf until you need them. Difference is not getting a 5 year shelf life but getting a shelf life as short as 1, or even 1/2 year, life -- if you 'tested' them under full load for a bit.
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On Oct 3, 8:04 am, "Stormin Mormon"

This was from memory during Projects: I prefaced with the caveat in case I misremembered. Somehow the subject came up during discussions with Eveready as I was comparing to Duracell. Interestingly, in our tests, Eveready lasted about twice as long as Duracell in the same applications. Ray-O-Vac lasted around 20% longer than Eveready, but had a tendency to leak when left unattended for long periods.
The comment came more like an aside, rather than part of the Project. But the importance didn't surface until I saw the plethora of "test your batteries here" cards where they were SELLING batteries, DUH! May also been part of the discussion of whether to save your batteries in the fridge. Again, as I understand it, yes, cooler they store longer, BUT, and this was a big warning, keep them dry, else they develop paths for self-discharge and all the 'goodness' of keeping them in a fridge will be undone.
As I responded here, thought would come to me, but didn't. Don't know the origin. Can still here the phrase and the 'tone' of the comment from the vendor as he said this under his breath, "Watch out. If you plan on storing your batteries for a long time; don't ever test them. If you do, a chemical process starts that accelerates the battery's discharge and you'll shorten its shelf life from 5-10 years down to 1 year."
Perhaps, an urban myth, don't know. But I really believed it when I saw how much the battery companies started touting how you should test your battery, right now, under full load, and do it often.
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Thanks for taking the time to explain a bit. Only time I remember Eveready, they were the old carbon zinc, and Duracells have always been alkalines. Do you mean Energizer?
I remember reading on the manufacturer web site, refrig is OK, freezer is not.
The one time I tested battery life using 2 AA mini mag. Mixed brands of alkaline AA cells, and they all lasted about the same.
Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus www.lds.org .
This was from memory during Projects: I prefaced with the caveat in case I misremembered. Somehow the subject came up during discussions with Eveready as I was comparing to Duracell. Interestingly, in our tests, Eveready lasted about twice as long as Duracell in the same applications. Ray-O-Vac lasted around 20% longer than Eveready, but had a tendency to leak when left unattended for long periods.
The comment came more like an aside, rather than part of the Project. But the importance didn't surface until I saw the plethora of "test your batteries here" cards where they were SELLING batteries, DUH! May also been part of the discussion of whether to save your batteries in the fridge. Again, as I understand it, yes, cooler they store longer, BUT, and this was a big warning, keep them dry, else they develop paths for self-discharge and all the 'goodness' of keeping them in a fridge will be undone.
As I responded here, thought would come to me, but didn't. Don't know the origin. Can still here the phrase and the 'tone' of the comment from the vendor as he said this under his breath, "Watch out. If you plan on storing your batteries for a long time; don't ever test them. If you do, a chemical process starts that accelerates the battery's discharge and you'll shorten its shelf life from 5-10 years down to 1 year."
Perhaps, an urban myth, don't know. But I really believed it when I saw how much the battery companies started touting how you should test your battery, right now, under full load, and do it often.
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wrote:

If non-rechargeable batteries DO NOT test them; if you plan on keeping them stored for later use.
It is my understanding that a chemical process starts up when a battery is used that then causes it to self discharge fairly rapidly compared to simply putting on a shelf until you need them. Difference is not getting a 5 year shelf life but getting a shelf life as short as 1, or even 1/2 year, life -- if you 'tested' them under full load for a bit.
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I've worked with batteries as an equipment designer for near 50 years. I'd be interested where you soused that bit of information as nothing I've seen be it lab/field work, vendors application data or various seminars (aka dog and pony shows) put on by the vendors ever mentioned that eventuality.
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Sorry, don't remember. But it was during a one on one meeting with vendor, actual battery manufacturer. so they knew their chemical processes. Was a long time ago, since then the batteries appear to have improved substantially to better than 40% more A-Hrs in the same package sizes, so the chemical processes may have changed and the effect no longer exists - I hope.
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On Wed, 3 Oct 2012 10:29:12 -0400, "Stormin Mormon"

Reminds me of a story I heard years ago. The Liars Club had their annual meeting to determine the best liar of the group. In turn, each got up and told an elaborate story, some taking a long time.
Finally, the last guy stepped to the podium. He simply said "I have two adult children and two flashlights at home and they all work"
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I'd have a hard time bettering that one.
I hope he stood on the podium, behind the lecturn.
Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus www.lds.org .
Reminds me of a story I heard years ago. The Liars Club had their annual meeting to determine the best liar of the group. In turn, each got up and told an elaborate story, some taking a long time.
Finally, the last guy stepped to the podium. He simply said "I have two adult children and two flashlights at home and they all work"
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Never stand on a lectern.
Greg
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Well, not if over the age of 2, and over 20 pounds weight.
Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus www.lds.org .
Never stand on a lectern.
Greg
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