Battery boost

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wrote:

The Frink was a bottom trip snowplow with a poly snowboard. The fish-plated mount was 2 plates of 3/8" steel bolted to the side of the frame back into the suspension area - making for a very strong and damage resistant mount - re-enforcing the truck frame. It was a BRUTE.
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snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca formulated on Saturday :

At first I thought "Frink plow" was a typo for "fricking plow", and "full fish-plate mount" was a blue-fin tuna on a dinner plate... :-?
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On 1/1/2016 6:07 PM, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

I've seen AAA trucks with a plastic and metal socket on the front. Matching socket on the cables (which were often wrapped around the snow plow hitch).
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On 01/01/2016 06:26 PM, Stormin Mormon wrote:
[snip]

The last time I called AAA (it was because of a dead battery), the driver didn't use jumper cables, but had a portable battery pack. It started and I drove to the shop. Battery replacement was free (battery was less than 2 years old).
BTW, when I shifted the car info gear (after AAA started it), it almost died. The lights got really dim.
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Mark Lloyd
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lacement was free (battery

my vans battery died, i got it started with my 200 amp boost battery charger.
i used the electric door lock and the engine nearly died. the garages battery tester reported bad cell. the battery was only 2 years old and replaced for free under warranty
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On 1/2/2016 4:02 PM, Mark Lloyd wrote:

Sounds like you had bad alternator?
One battery jumper pack I bought, had a caution not to leave it under the hood and use it as a starting battery. I guess someone probably tried that. I find it easier to replace the battery when needed, not try to rig up some thing.
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On 01/03/2016 06:59 AM, Stormin Mormon wrote:

or it was nearly overloaded from trying to charge a bad battery, so the transmission caused enough voltage drop to interfere with ignition.

Maybe it won't be too much longer before we have lithium batteries that completely replace lead-acid.
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On 1/3/2016 9:56 AM, Mark Lloyd wrote:

And cars spontaneously bursting into flames?! :>
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Once the battery starts the car, the charging system is supposed to take the battery totally out of the circuit, providing charge to the battery only as needed and capable of providing (do they still call it a voltage regulator?), but not at the expense of the running engine.
It's why checking your charging system is as simple as disconnecting the battery from the circuit after starting the engine. If the electrical/charging system is working properly, no battery is necessary, and it can be completely removed from a running vehicle.
Not sure if this applies to newest vehicles, those with onboard computers and event data recorders (ERDs) and other digital nonsense.
Give it a try. Start the engine in yer vehicle. Disconnect the battery (remove neg cable) and the engine should remain running.
nb
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On 1/3/2016 10:18 AM, notbob wrote:

I think that only *nominally* works. I'm not sure alternators are sized large enough to handle worst case loads -- even on cars with *just* "factory equipment" -- headlamps, foglamps, sat heaters, sound system, navigation, windshield defrosters (front & rear), etc.
I suspect there is some duty cycle calculations that goes into how these loads are reflected in the alternator's output capacity. And, how variations in the field affect output.

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On Sun, 03 Jan 2016 10:24:59 -0700, Don Y

Most vehicles have a large enough alternator to handle all normal loads plus charge the battery when running at road speed. Not at idle. HOWEVER. Note that some vehicles will not run without the battery even if the alternator is working properly, and some vehicled will destroy the computer if run without the battery.
Please, only test your alternator function with a proper voltmeter.
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On Sunday, January 3, 2016 at 12:18:10 PM UTC-5, notbob wrote:

It's not just the digital stuff.
Regarding the seat heaters in my Honda Odyssey, the manual says:
"Follow these precautions when using the seat heaters:
Use the HI setting only to heat the seats quickly, because it draws large amounts of current from the battery.
If the engine is left idling for an extended period, do not use the seat heaters, even on the LO setting. It can weaken the battery, causing hard starting."
In other words, there are some systems that still draw current from the battery, even with the engine running.

No thank you.
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On 1/3/2016 12:18 PM, notbob wrote:

I've heard that causes a major voltage spike. Damages electronics. Not a good test now days.
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Not true on all vehicles, and a dangerous way to test on others. The battery on MOST vehicles today needs to be in place for the vehicle to run and the charging system to function.

Don't try it. Some vehicle computers can be damaged by removing the battery connection while the alternator is charging.. The best way to test if an alternator is running is with a voltmater or other charging voltage indicator (there are boxes with several LEDs that light up telling you either the voltage or the condition of the charging system) The proper tool to do the test is CHEAP and readily available, and something every automotive DIYer should have at his disposal.

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With all the electronics on the newer cars I would not chance unhooking the battery.
Even the $ 6 or free multimeter form Harbor Freight will do the check the charging system. Take a volt reading before starting the car and after. If the voltage does not go up, look into the charging system. The meter does not even have to be accurate, just compair it to a known good car if in doubt.
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On Sun, 3 Jan 2016 17:44:46 -0500, "Ralph Mowery"

A bad idea on older cars too. On my way home from work one day I noticed my ammeter was reading way high. '66 Ford F-100 with 352. Stopped at a gas station and told the mechanic to check it out. He disconnected a battery cable while it was running - don't know which one. The heater fan took off like a jet engine, and a bunch of fuses blew, and a couple tail light bulbs. And I shut it down almost instantly with the ignition key. Drove it home (about 1/2 mile) and fixed everything. Think the alt had failed with an open diode. Unusual fail mode.
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Prolly true. I got nothing newer than '90. ;)
nb
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On Monday, January 4, 2016 at 11:00:57 AM UTC-5, notbob wrote:

Heck, even my radios complain when I unhook the battery.
"Enter Code"
It's a security feature that I hope the thieves know about. It's no help to me if they rip out the radio and then can't use it without the code. I'd still be without a radio. All I can hope is that the thieves know about the feature and move on to the next vehicle.
I don't recall if it was in this forum or another, but one guy was saying that he lives without a radio because he refuses to pay a dealer the $50 they want to look up the code for his radio. He changed his battery and now has no working radio.
I've got 3 Honda's with that feature. Luckily I have the codes for all 3.
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On 1/3/2016 5:36 PM, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

My quick and easy test for alternator voltage is to turn on the windshield wipers. The wipe rate gives me a quick idea if the voltage is low.
A VOM (volt ohm miliameter) can also be useful. If one knows what to do, and where to check. I've done alternator tests with one.
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notbob posted for all of us...

Ya think?

It doesn't

I wouldn't.
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