Battery backup for sump pump?? Look...

I recently converted a basement space into a finished, computer area. Part of the moistuer treatment was hacing a sump pit and two drain channels dug under the floor. The sump pump in the put activates rarely, but in really moist periods it comes on every 20 mins, for 3-4 seconds, or so. I worry about what would happen if power went out.
Rather than just having a standby generator, could I use a computer batter backup system, like these from APC:
http://www.apc.com/products/category.cfm?paramcategory &web_displayed=a ll
...or would the load, even tho it only runs 3-4 seconds each time, be too much? It's a small pump - maybe it'd be ok.
I'd feel better with one of these _and_ a generator vs. a standby generator alone. Thanks.
bp
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The problem with battery backup pumps is the fact that when you are most likely to need them (power off) is also the time when you are most likely going to need a lot of pumping, like during the storm that knocked the tree down that shut off the power.
They just don't have the capacity to pump all that much before the battery goes dead.
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Joseph E. Meehan

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You wont have the power with a reg APC Look into water powered, Basepump or Zoeller No batteries to go bad. Also set your float so it runs alot longer. Less cycles are easier on the pump maybe 20 -30 sec run time.
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snipped-for-privacy@webtv.net (mark Ransley) wrote:

So an APC won't support it for that long a period or it simply does not have enough juice for the pump even to function at all?
I bought a generator today w/ 12-hour runtime (4 gal tank).
bp
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Figure 2 times actual start up amp draw 2.5 times for saftey . 1/3 hp sump should take 800 to run and 1600 to start. What does your pump use to run what does your power supply have Small computer units were not designed for high load. what generator did you get UPS shouldnt be charged off a generator
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I recently converted a basement space into a finished, computer area. Part of the moistuer treatment was hacing a sump pit and two drain channels dug under the floor. The sump pump in the put activates rarely, but in really moist periods it comes on every 20 mins, for 3-4 seconds, or so. I worry about what would happen if power went out.
Rather than just having a standby generator, could I use a computer batter backup system, like these from APC:
"http://www.apc.com/products/category.cfm?paramcategory &web_displayed=all"
...or would the load, even tho it only runs 3-4 seconds each time, be too much? It's a small pump - maybe it'd be ok.
I'd feel better with one of these _and_ a generator vs. a standby generator alone. Thanks.
bp
-- Heisenberg may have slept here.
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If your sump is large enough, why not install a small 12 volt bilge pump.. They are cheap and some have the float switch built right in.. These run off a battery for long periods of time without attentions.. A group 27 battery in a safety box should be enough for a stormy period.
A small trickle charge would complete the whole installation..
Steve
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Blake Patterson wrote:

have an unfinished 1/4 basement 5' of which is below the water table (lakefront home). APC 250, 500, and 700VA units all immediately kick into overload when my 1/4hp submersable type pump kicks in. The startup load exceeds a typical smaller UPSs specs. I plan on lugging home a 1500 unit, but purely for amusement value at this point. Im up to a 80lbs unit which if new would be about $500. Ive concluded that a computer UPS is not a viable-cost effective solution. The UPS needs to be capable of handling the startup load of the pump. This factor sizes the UPS way out of proportion in my opinion.
Last year however we lost power for two days. I "borrowed" the DC sump pump from my brother in laws boat after the 1st day. It cleared 2ft of water down under in about an hour running off a spare car battery. I then swapped out the drained battery and cleared the other 1ft.
I've decided a deep cycle marine battery ($80?), a trickle charger ($20), a boat sump pump w/float ($20-30 range), and a garden hose ($8.99) is my solution. I'll be putting my battery in a plastic cooler and caulk up the cable holes to keep corrosion of the battery terminals down. My basement is WET. Its there for the utils only. Yours doesnt sound like its that wet.
By "computer room" this could be a room where a PC and a hiding husband get together or a commercial hosting facility or anywhere in between..If theres a good amount of hardware invested, then other things to consider: - A sump pit accumulates water, and rarely is completely dry. Do you have a constant source of humidity in your computer room? Get a humidity guage and determine if you should think dehumidifier. - raised floor, although you mention channels so you have that covered? - keep power cables off of the floor?. - generator. a- due diligence if this is a commercial enterprise. b- remember that generators kick in AFTER the power goes out. All systems lose power briefly. If you want systems up, then a UPS is needed generator or not. Your thinking is correct on this matter to protect the systems. (maybe not the pump though) - UPS: if you protect your systems with a UPS big enough, i'd still shy away from powering the pump with it. I wont plug my drill into a computer rack power source either. Noisy motors and sensitive equipment dont mix in my book. MPDsville mybluelight.com
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Electric motors have a lot more startup current than computers. If you buy a UPS for your sump (which is actually a good idea) buy a BIG one, and try it out for real before depending on it. I mean, plug it in for 24 hours to charge the battery,a nd then unplug the UPS and see if the sump runs.
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I've not been following this one but has anyone thought of using a car batter left on trickle charge and a (boat) bilge pump? They start from about $15 and a decent one can be had for $30.
Nick..
On Sun, 23 Nov 2003 07:39:15 -0500, "Stormin Mormonn"

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The problem with using a UPS is that it is designed to convert power from a 12 volt lead acid car battery to 120 volts to run your computer. This is an expensive conversion process, and it limits the peak power that can be drawn. Since 12 volt motors are common it is much cheaper to drive the motor straight from the battery, and better since I you can easily pull enough power from a car battery to weld a wrench to the terminals. I know - I did that for fun a couple times when I was a kid. A car battery can certainly turn over a motor as big as a car engine for quite some time, done that many times.

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Oh god...
Did you ever get your furnace in that tin can to run on that UPS setup? I didint think so.

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Hey, CB, someone's spoofing you. No swear words.
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Regular UPS are not good for a sump they are not designed for inductive loads. Or major draw The surge can be 400% of pump rating. An old worn pump , even more. And the cost ? alot more than a dedicated Battery or Water powered system. Water power wont fail. 3 to 500 installed
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Something few know charging a regular unmatched UPS off a generator can blow a generator . Tripp and even Honda say dont do it. Even with the EU series. The UPS will run voltage to ground on voltage swings.
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CBHcrack wrote:

And, you had to look it up to see if it was Chris????

And that was a surprise????
You're not the brightest bulb on the sting...
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Stormin Mormonn wrote:

BFD. Any hemoroid can do that..
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Most of the time, however, it is done by some retard thats got no life, and uses EArthlink...wonder why?
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Hey, thanks for your sincere concern. As it happens, when the fan blower tried to kick on, the voltage at the inverter input dropped to about 11 at the inverter. I suspect the six wire they shipped with it isn't adequate. So, someday I've got to wire a second battery in parallel. I've got the battery adn the wires, just havn't gotten around to it yet.
I'll keep you posted.
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