Bathroom wall framing for towel racks, etc.

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Just thought about another "feature" I can install in my bathroom remodel project...
That is, how many times have you seen a bathroom towel rack, toilet paper holder, etc. torn from the drywall and then it is a pain to put back up securely?
I've seen this many times. And since my drywall is not yet up, I think I will frame in multiple "sideways" 2 x 6's anywhere there might be a towel rack, toilet paper holder, etc. Then just use wood screws to anchor the towel rack as it will be all wood behind the wall in that area.
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Take some pictures and write the height on the picture. Save them for later.
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Great idea. But if I do not have any blocking or studs for towel racks, I usually use toggle bolts because they are far superior to anchors.
As far as toilet paper holders, I like to use the recessed ones because they save space and just look neater. Plus you cant rip them off the wall like surface mount holders.
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I've used those plastic "EZ-Ancors". Their huge threads work very /very/ well for towel racks and shelving mounted directly to drywall.
(Amazon.com product link shortened)
You can buy them locally at HD and Lowe's.
--
Tegger

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wrote:

Second those things. I don't waste a second looking for a stud anymore. Drive a screw. if it hits a stud, fine-- if it doesn't, I know where I want to put the anchor.
They come in metal, too, but I don't see a difference. I've hung some pretty heavy stuff off them.
Jim
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Yep! They're great for hanging things like towel bars and curtain rods.
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I'd have to conclude the fixtures you've seen torn from walls were either improperly mounted, abused, or installed in less than 1/2" wallboard.
When I was remodeling bathrooms and installed surface mount fixtures I either grouted them in (ceramic) or used mollys (chrome). http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Molly_%28fastener%29 -----
- gpsman
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Bill wrote:

You can do it in reverse too; i.e., on the finish side of the drywall...screw a decorative board to one or more studs, fasten rack to it.
--

dadiOH
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Rather than use 2x6's which are small compared to the wall size, on non-bearing walls you can notch the front face of the studs and install a strip of 3/4" plywood banding around the wall which is must larger than the blocking studs and will support additional weight over a larger area rather than being super strong in a much smaller and more limited location... That way there you won't be having to open up the walls if you want to add something heavy to the wall later on, and while toggle bolts are strong, you wouldn't want to be putting holes in the wall cavities which could allow moisture to penetrate the walls and develop mold inside where you can not see it...
~~ Evan
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As an alternative you can use some heavier gauge metal track running horizontally. Just make a couple snips on either side of each vertical stud on both top and bottom flange of the track, install it with the bottom of the track facing out and one drywall screw into each stud, and you have continuous blocking lickety split. The track has a couple of raised ridges running along either side of the bottom, so just swat them flush with the stud with a hammer so they don't hold the drywall away from the stud and cause problems with screw pops.
It's fine for towel racks but you shouldn't be hanging cabinets from it. If you want to hang something heavier, you can slip a 2x4 inside the track and attach it with a couple of screws. No need to worry about an exact fit with the 2x4, toenails and such.
R
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On 2/1/2011 5:55 PM, RicodJour wrote:

Hunk o' 2x4 sounds like a lot less work. Adding blocking while walls is open is traditional approach. A critical step people often forget is to document where they put the blocks- a photo (with yardstick or tape measure) or quick sketch on graph paper, kept someplace you'll be able to find it, can save a lot of trial and error.
If you are replacing tub, don't forget a band of blocking behind the top lip.
--
aem sends...

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Depends on how much blocking has to be installed, but yes, cutting some 2x is the standard method. I was offering an alternative, and that's why I started off with, "As an alternative..." And cutting blocking to fit securely between studs and nailing them off flush would take about the same amount of time as my alternative method. The only real benefit to my alternative method is that it lets you use up scrap and cut all of the blocking to the same length. But it's just an alternative. ;)

I used to take Polaroid pictures of the framing prior to covering things up. Digital camera are a Godsend for things like that.

And for grab bars and pedestal sink attachment.
R
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Second the motion! BTDT...my bathroom remodel some decades ago still has original towel bars, etc., still secure and viable having survived two active teens. One towel bar even doubles as a grab handle for exiting the tub/ shower. Well worth the small extra effort to do it that way. In my project flat mounted and glued/screwed 2 x 4's were adequate.
Joe
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wall, and drywall over it. That way it is impossible to get the screws into the crack between the 2X6s
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On Feb 1, 9:46pm, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

Cover the entire wall with 3/4" ply? A bit expensive where scrap is usually used, most people don't have towel bars 1' from the ceiling, if you're only covering part of the wall you'd have to fur out the rest of the wall or design some transition to cover the wall depth discrepancy.
As far as the screws into the cracks between the blocking - layout is everything. It's customary to determine attachment points prior to installing the blocking, and that's not very tough to do in a bathroom.
One thing that has always bothered me is that towel bars and grab bars are frequently 18", 24" or 30" long. Never could understand that.
R
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It might suggest anchoring them in studs is overkill.
What's the weight of 2 bath-wet towels, 6 pounds, tops? -----
- gpsman
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"gpsman" wrote in message

With normal use, not a problem...
But I have learned there are two types of people. Those who break things and those who fix things.
Around this group and including myself are those who fix things... So I suppose we don't know what people do to tear these towel racks from the wall???
Maybe kids try hanging from them? Maybe adults as well?
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When I worked for a builder I had a service call to fix two towel racks. After removing broken screws on one and re hanging it I starting on the down stairs bath, I heard the first one fall off again ,it had a five year old attached to it. The next week the woman said her garage door had a dent in it. The stupid bitch forgot to open it when she backed out. She thought we would fix it ! She moved back to section-8 a year later .
Jr.
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Mounting a grab bar to a stud is overkill? Read that again.

This thread started this way:

I've also seen it many times. Maybe those people have lead towels? Or just possibly they get more abuse than the weight of towels.
Your mileage will not vary. You've seen the same thing.
R
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I was picturing the grab bars I've seen mounted to pre-installed ceramic tile walls.

I didn't say I hadn't seen it, but IME the bar tends to break or bend first. -----
- gpsman
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