Bathroom Sheetrock

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On Sun, 04 Sep 2005 20:42:10 -0400, Amun wrote:

Give it up. GH is right. Greenboard is not something a sane person would use as a tile substrate. I had the tile around a tub fail for exactly what you're proposing. The tile *caved* in on my kid while he was taking a bath (not totally coincidental).

You really are dense. Put up the backer-board and use thin-set to anchor the tiles. Any job doing is worth doing is worth a couple of bucks more to do right. Tiling over any sheetrock is foolish. ...at least.
--
Keith




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hillbilly.
I am going to say it again.
Millions of homes have nothing but greenboard and never have any problems.
Sure, concrete backer board is stronger, but only an idiot would rip out already installed greenboard/drywall if there are no visible problems
If you lean against ANY drywall and go through, you have severe FRAMING PROBLEMS, that no amount of cement board will fix.
And if tiles are coming off on your head, they were never applied properly in the first place. Elmers white paper glue is not recommended by most tile manufacturers
And if you keep knocking holes in your shower or tub. You need anger management therapy, not cement board.
And judging by the tone of some posts, I'd say some here need to consider medication. Or at least cut back to no more than 40 cups of coffee a day.
AMUN
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A Moronic Underdeveloped Nit wrote:

Your breath stinks like dog shit. STFU

Wrong again you gap-toothed inbred. On both accounts. You're unqualified for anything 'cept smegma taste testing, how the hell would you know anyway, you stump stupid sheep fucker.

Nobody suggested that.
<snipped the mindless drivel>
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would
anchor
problems.
In your case, stop the coffee completely.
ROTFLMAO
AMUN
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On Mon, 05 Sep 2005 09:34:37 -0400, Amun wrote:

Ok, but it doesn' tmake what you say any more accurate.

Millions of homes have only insulation board for sheathing too, but that doesnt' make it somehow "right".

I guess I'm an idiot. Ripping out sheetrock and installing Hardi-Backer, or similar, isn't exactly rocket-surgery. It's rather simple, actually.

The problem is water penetration through a failed grout joint. I've had it happen. While noone went "through", the tile came down in the tub with my (then) 5-yo. It had nothing to do with the studs. They were fine, but the wallboard had disintegrated under the tile.

You're right. They weren't installed properly in the first place. They were installed on *sheetrock*. Anyone who does such shoddy work should be *shot*.

Elmers white paper glue is not recommended by most tile manufacturers
Neither is sheetrock as a substrate. Go figure.

Clueless.
Perhaps, but in this case you're simply wrong. Changing a word or two won't make you any more right.
--
Keith


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The name calling, insults, and arguing make you both look like idiots and made me think neither of you were really right.
"Millions of homes have only insulation board for sheathing too, but that doesnt' make it somehow "right"."
Actually, yes, with cross bracing in the framing this would be a correct application to meet code in many areas of the country, and it actually performs quite well when done correctly.
Tile over plain gypsum sheet rock or green/blue board is just a bad idea in area where there is water...with a caveat or two. It can be done in conjunction with products like Schluter's Kerdi and Ditra. http://tinyurl.com/e3mou
If you're tiling in a wet area, a CBU should be used. And, despite what's been written here, almost any tile job will eventually fail. It's just a question of time. Even a tile job on Green/Blue board will last for some time, even in a shower. It was common practice to tile over Green/Blue board for many years, but anyone who still does it is probably too arrogant to realize that we learn from out mistakes. Our mistakes? Yeah...despite what the one guy has said, the industry has changed because most green/blue board tile jobs in wet areas have failed.
Recent example? I'm in the middle of a 4 bathroom makeover in a house my friend recently bought. He got a hell of a deal on it. Didn't realize until the first wall fell on his kid that it was because of how the bathrooms were built. All the tubs and showers were built with green board 12 years ago and they're all falling apart now. ALL OF THEM!
I've spent much of my life working in this industry and can say, without reservation, the only acceptable backer in a wet area, as far as I'm concerned is a CBU...Cementitious Backer Unit, i.e. HardiBacker, Wonderboard, Durock. You can go a step better and simply float a wall with lathe and mud, but most folks aren't interested in spending that kind of money. As far as gypsum goes, I can't say as I would ever use it. However, I have heard some guys swear by Denshield for stone walls/floors where there's no real question about whether or not a lot of moisture will get through. Then again, those guys that swear by it, in my experience, are also the ones selling it.
Would I rip out an existing installation over green board to put in a CBU backed installation? Not until it failed or I got tired of looking at it.
And...quit the childish fighting?
--
ShadowHawk
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Cindy ( snipped-for-privacy@newsguy.com) said...

I wouldn't get too paranoid about a few splashes on the tiles. The tile surface (assuming glazed tiles) is non-porous. Grout will allow water to get through, but unless there was a constant spray of water.
The reason why I went with greenboard on the lower half of non-direct water exposure walls is because of the *possibility* of a small spill leaving a puddle that doesn't get cleaned up right away. A little of that drawn through the grout shouldn't be too harmful to greenboard.
Longstanding water in that situation is going to crumble greenboard just as well as regular drywall.
--
Calvin Henry-Cotnam
"Never ascribe to malice what can equally be explained by incompetence."
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Not really that big of an issue. If it's going behind tile that will actually get wet, like in the shower, then it should have cement board rather than drywall anway. And if you have a moisture problem in your bathroom that's going to have to be fixed regardless. Otherwise, for regular walls, it shouldn't matter.
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We have a fiberglass shower and a whirlpool that has a couple of feet of tile above it...other than that, no tile. It's not typically moist in the room so it sounds like we're okay with sheetrock...right?
Thanks,
Cin
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Cindy wrote:

Yes.
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