Bathroom renovation.


I have some time off work and I want to renovate my bathroom--which is much too small.The bathroom is on the second floor of a two storey house.The wall that the soil pipes(?) and water lines are in and come up from the basement and feed the existing bathroom is also shared by a small bedroom.My plan is to turn this small bedroom into a bathroom and turn my existing bathroom into a walk-in closet (it shares a common wall with my master bedroom).I would gut both rooms down to the studs and then probably hire an electrician and plumber to do the wireing and run the plumbing pipes.Then I would do the drywalling and tiling and finishing work.The first step is to come up with a design and layout, but before I can do that I need to know a few things about plumbing.If I design my new bathtub and shower and sinks to be against the opposite wall to the one with the plumbing pipes, is a plumber going to be able to run the new water pipes and drain pipes across the room from the second floor, or is he going to have to install them from the main floor and remove the ceiling?I assume the drain pipes would be installed in the second floor joists.The second floor joists would run paralell to the new drain pipes.Or if I install the new toilet against the opposite wall to where the soil pipes run, is a plumber going to be able to run a drain across the room?( I dont know what kind of slope they need on their drain pipes)If all of this is feasible, then I need to know if it is going to add signifigantly to my costs to install all of the plumbing fixtures against the opposite wall to where the plumbing comes up from the basement. Thanks for your help.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
brent wrote:

Lot of variables. Slope is 1/4" per foot. You *may* be able to get away with using 3" PVC/ABS drain. ASK your bldg inspector first! The floor and subfloor has to come off, naturally. And verify that the joists DO run the right way!
You WILL need a vent going up from the fixture bank. That may have to go up the far wall and into the attic to either a new roof terminal or to tie into the existing stack vent.
One word of advice: If you run PVC/ABS, there is a very good chance that you will be disappointed with the sound of rushing water and drip noises following every toilet flush to be clearly heard in the room below! Either clad the PVC/ABS in sound deadener (not insulation!) or substitute cast iron drain pipe.
This job needs a lot of thought by a competent contractor.
Jim
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Since you are going to do it anyway, gut the rooms. Then you can see what is going on with the existing plumbing and wiring and any other surprises. Have some contractors come in and take a look and let them tell you what can and cannot be done. As an electrician it is always a pleasure to see open walls and ceilings. That way I know exactly what I am getting into and don't have to make allowances in my price for unknowns. You can lock in your final design after getting feedback from everyone and having explored the inner walls, ceilings, and floors.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.