Bathroom Remodel

Page 2 of 2  


Which is about the selling price for a used tub around here. A refinished one is a few hundred on up. Don't bust 'em up. The scrap gets sold to China and it comes back here as, well, scrap.
R
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Fri, 27 Aug 2010 12:58:30 -0700 (PDT), RicodJour

Give the tub to a local architectural / historical salvage store in your area. Or a Habitat Restore.
Get four linebackers to carry this monster down the stairs.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

re: "Any suggestions out there (I don't have any) for how "hibb" could or should deal with the window in the new shower/tub area?"
Sure...
http://images.crateandbarrel.com/is/image/Crate/TamaraShwrCurtainLinenF9 ?$share$
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Yeah, make the window go away, replace it with glass block, make it be even with the installed tilework, and have a vent fan tied to a humidity sensor, and a ceiling fan in the room as well to reduce stratification.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

First time? That is okay we have all been there.

That is 100% normal. If you replace is with a tub only your green board or concrete board should be installed in exactly the same manner as the old stuff was. That is the way it is done.
To decide what to do, measure the distance between the studs. The standard is 60" maybe a tad more. Replacement tubs will fit fine though they may be a hassle to get into place. You may want to add a couple of studs to the two sides depending on the type of tub you choose just to have an attachment point for the new tub or shower doors.
Chance are almost zero that you can get a one piece fiberglass surround tub into that location.
What would you like to do? Ask more questions so the group can help you do it right, especially if you plan to have a shower head in the tub.
--
Colbyt
Please come visit http://www.househomerepair.com
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Cool, so that will save me a lot of work. If I am correct, there are some pretty good ways of refinishing the old tub enamel.
I thought I would put in a shower head. But I'm not sure it is needed since we have a shower downstairs.
I also discovered a hidden junction box that I took out and now is causing me problems. I will post another thread on that.
Thanks, David
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

A pro refinishing shouldn't cost more than a couple or three hundred. That's the guy coming to your place and doing it. The stuff they spray, and the longevity of the coating, will be superior to what you could do.

Showers are more desirable than tubs. Including a shower head while the place is all opened up is trivial and relatively inexpensive. Omitting the shower head will downgrade your bathroom in the eyes of many buyers, appraisers, etc. I'd rethink this one.

Hidden junction boxes often equal a nightmare - either yours, or the guy who installed it who could figure out no other way to make things work - generally a hack.
R
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
hibb wrote the following:

A tub without a shower to rinse off is just a soaking pool and hardly more cleaner than bathing in a pond. How does one rinse off the soap scum, dirt, and dead body cells that one has wallowed in during the bath? It's like washing a car and then wiping it dry without rinsing off the soap and loose dirt beforehand.

--

Bill
In Hamptonburgh, NY
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

re: "Rinsing in the shower after a bath is more a matter of squeamishness than necessity"
For that matter, bathing is more a matter of squeamishness than necessity.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

You've got the wall open, so add a shower head. The ratio of work-to- gain is absolutely huge.
We're talking a couple of extra connections and next to no cost compared to everything else you are doing.
If you took a poll and offered the choice between a tub only and a shower only, the shower only votes would blow away the competition.
Since you got the easy option of adding a shower to an existing tub, don't pass it up.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

..
I figured I probably would even tho we do have a shower in the bathroom downstairs.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Do you mean that your tub isn't installed like the rest of us have ours installed?
http://www.mytorontohomeimprovement.com/wp-content/uploads/2009/01/installing-bathtub.jpg
Poor you.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Poor me indeed! :)
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
David,
A good website for renovating a bathroom.
http://www.johnbridge.com /
Their focus is on tile, but they cover non-tile installations too. If you are going to add a shower, you'll probably need to make some changes to your existing setup.
Good luck.
dss
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Thanks, DSS.
I've got the site bookmarked and will look it over more once I get past the electrical problems that cropped up.
David
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Hi David,

If you're going to the trouble of gutting the bathroom, you might as well install a new modern steel tub. They're relatively inexpensive (under $200 at most home centers), and you'll get a new finish with a tub that is designed for modern fixtures. If it were a fancy clawfoot tub it might be different, but yours sounds like an old generic tub.
I'm sure you wouldn't want a shiny new bathroom with an old rusted and/or discolored tub. :)

The tub should mount directly to the studs, then the wall finish overlap the lip of the tub. You should attach a horizontal support around the tub area to support the underside edge of the tub. If the tub does not have a foam support pad built in, test fit the tub to make sure it fits, then pour a rough mortar bed to set the tub in. This will make the tub feel more solid, as well as providing a level base if the floor has any variations.
Also, you should use cement board or hardibacker behind the tile, NOT drywall. Drywall should not be used in a wet location like a bath/shower surround. As extra insurance, I recommend applying a waterproofing membrane like Kerdi to the backerboard before tiling. An extra expense now, but good insurance for the future.

Bathtubs are usually standard dimensions (5' being typical), so you probably won't have any issues. But, you can always shim out the studs if needed to get the exact space you need for a new tub.
You can special order tubs in other sizes, but it's probably cheaper to pick the closest standard size and shim out the studs as needed to make it fit.
Good luck,
Anthony
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
See if there's a Habitat For Humanity Restore in your area. I needed a tub to replace one that was in less than wonderful condition. First, the sledge hammer kinda bounced. But when I used my old pick (pointed at one end) it put an excellent crack in it, and I just kept making more cracks and turned that old tub into pieces I could put in my pocket if I wanted. I went to the Restore, found a Jacuzzi-type tub, fibreglas, that may have never been used. It had been put out a month before for $250, so after the month it became $125. My wife would NEVER let us go back to a regular tub for baths, and this one is deep enough and so comfortable for me, too. There wasn't a pump, but I got one for $20, but I haven't put it in, I just shunted the water jet fittings because SWMBO prefers to take 2-hour soaking baths after her weight-training class. A pump makes things cool down quickly.
Really, you need to acquaint yourself with what's available out there.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
.....' First, the sledge hammer kinda bounced. But when I used my old pick (pointed at one end) it put an excellent crack in it, and I just kept making more cracks and turned that old tub into pieces I could put in my pocket if I wanted.
++++++++++++++++++
When I did my tub smashing experience (for the first time), I used a heavy 16 pound sledge hammer and that worked. I also had a lighter sledge hammer and that did tend to bounce off. I also brought a pick with me, and like you, it did work at creating the initial cracks that are sometimes needed to get the whole tub break-up going. But, the 16 pound sledge hammer was enough on its own.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.