Bathroom Mirror Question

I need to replace the mirror in my bathroom because the silver backing has worn off around the bottom. The mirror has only been up about 4 years. The same thing happened to the old one. I am not sure, but a discussion with my neighbors tells me that this is a common problem here in FL. Most of us moved here from other places (less humid) and had not had this problem before.
Would having a mirror with a frame around it offer any protection? Mine are all the plain kind, no frame. I am having the same problems with two mirrors. One came from Home Depot the other from a shop selling mirors and shower doors. Both moderate prices. Anybody have any suggestions about prolonging the life of these things?
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Try mounting the mirror an inch or more above the backsplash. I'v seen this happen on several mirrors. I think it is the result of mounting the mirror against a surface where water collects. TB
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As suggested you can mount the mirror a little higher or you can consider things that may keep moisture away from the back, but my suggestion is close to yours. Use a frame, but not to protect it, rather to hide it. Have the frame overlap the front edge so it hides about an inch of glass all the way around. You will still have the bad spots, but no one will be able to see them for years to come.
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Joseph Meehan

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worn
same
moved
are
mirrors.
doors.
life
is it sitting directly on the vanity or is there a backsplash? does the mirror sit in a channeling called a "J" channel or does it sit by itself?
direct moisture, a constant humidity, and cleaning products are a mirrors (the silvering on the back, the front is just plain glass) worst enemy, especially at the bottom wheere stuff collects. buy a new mirror from a local glass co. ask them if they use a sealant for the edges and see if you can buy a "J" channel to set the mirror in. the "J" comes in many colors and varities(usually use what your sink fixtures are (ie; chrome,gold...) and a 5/8" "J" is quite sufficient. cut about a couple blocks out of something rubbery or soft that won't deteriorate and will support the weight of the mirror (i've used vinyl baseboard material and it's just about 1/8" thick and works perfect but clear blocks are sold in different thicknesses,again ask your local glass guy) and set the blocks about 2" from each end. you want about 1/4" - 3/8" in the channel on each side. this will allow the mirror some airspace in the channeking so it's not resting directly in or on water or such. lastly when washing and using the sink try to avouid over splashing the mirror so stuff doesn't constantly run in and around the mirror.
good luck.....
mike..........
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spray the back, especially the edges with spray varnish. anything with acids in it will cause mirror to discolor.
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Thank you. I copied your message and will take it with me when I go to the store.
The mirror sits about four inches about the backsplash. It is too high for water to actually reach it but it has plenty of moisture in the air just from taking showers.
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