Bathroom faucet handles loose

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New (less than a year) bathroom sink installed. I wanted two white porcelain handles, which I got. But can't find receipt to give mfr. name! Couldn't find exact photo on-line, but this may not matter?
Handles get loose all the time and have to be screwed tight.
QUESTION: Is there a downside to gluing/fastening those puppies shut so they won't keep coming unscrewed?
If it's OK, what is recommended product?
TIA
HB
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"Higgs Boson" wrote in message
New (less than a year) bathroom sink installed. I wanted two white porcelain handles, which I got. But can't find receipt to give mfr. name! Couldn't find exact photo on-line, but this may not matter?
Handles get loose all the time and have to be screwed tight.
QUESTION: Is there a downside to gluing/fastening those puppies shut so they won't keep coming unscrewed?
If it's OK, what is recommended product?
TIA
I would use clear silicone. That would keep the screw tight BUT it could also be removed if needed. WW
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Sorry to hear. Quality of manufacturing is suffering.
Downside of gluing the handles on, is when you need to get them apart for service, such as changing a faucet washer. I'd try low strength Locktite. . Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus www.lds.org . .
New (less than a year) bathroom sink installed. I wanted two white porcelain handles, which I got. But can't find receipt to give mfr. name! Couldn't find exact photo on-line, but this may not matter?
Handles get loose all the time and have to be screwed tight.
QUESTION: Is there a downside to gluing/fastening those puppies shut so they won't keep coming unscrewed?
If it's OK, what is recommended product?
TIA
HB
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On 6/14/2013 7:28 AM, Stormin Mormon wrote:

handles, which I got. But can't find receipt to give mfr. name! Couldn't find exact photo on-line, but this may not matter?

I discovered that they did sell a permanent and non-permanent type a few years ago. Everybody might not know this.
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Aparently, the OP bought the non permanant faucet handles?
Loctite comes in red, blue, and some other color. Red is permanant, I think. Blue, if I remember, is the removable type. . Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus www.lds.org . .
wrote in message

I discovered that they did sell a permanent and non-permanent type a few years ago. Everybody might not know this.
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wrote:

That is correct. Blue is the easier to remove strength. Red isn't really permanent, just takes a lot more force. Blue would be fine for this. I use it on my snowboard mounting screws. Keeps them from coming out, but they still come out readily with a screwdriver.
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On 6/14/2013 3:48 PM, snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net wrote:

I wonder if some sort of hot-melt glue would work? If the handles are all metal, they could be heated up and hot-melt applied to the inside and a small butane torch could be used to carefully heat them for removal. I've used several types of hot-melt glue in the past and I seem to remember some that worked well on metal. ^_^
TDD
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Higgs Boson wrote:

Nothing too strong. A drop of varnish, lacquer, nail polish etc. will usually suffice.
--

dadiOH
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Wow, I thought I was the only person who used nail polish for threadlock. I call it "female thread lock". I've had customers ask why I have finger nail polish in my tool box, on the top tray. . Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus www.lds.org . .

Nothing too strong. A drop of varnish, lacquer, nail polish etc. will usually suffice.
--

dadiOH



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On Thursday, June 13, 2013 5:09:48 PM UTC-7, Higgs Boson wrote:

handles, which I got. But can't find receipt to give mfr. name! Couldn't find exact photo on-line, but this may not matter?

If you have those universal handles with the set screws they always get loose. I try to stay away from using them as much as possible.
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On Friday, June 14, 2013 6:36:04 AM UTC-7, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

porcelain handles, which I got. But can't find receipt to give mfr. name! Couldn't find exact photo on-line, but this may not matter?

Wish I could, but they are on the only sink in the only bathroom in the house.
HB
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On Thursday, June 13, 2013 5:09:48 PM UTC-7, Higgs Boson wrote:

handles, which I got. But can't find receipt to give mfr. name! Couldn't find exact photo on-line, but this may not matter?

Thanks to all for suggestions.
1. Is Locktite removable if necessary? If so, what is the solvent?
2. Same for clear nail polish. I assume the solvent is polish remover?
3. Went to Locktite site and got another idea. What about wrapping in plumber's/electrician's thread tape?
Together, our giant minds will lick this one yet!
HB
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 Couldn't find exact photo on-line, but this may not matter?

Yes. Use the lower strength blue. There is no solvent, it just helps bind the threads and you remove as usual with a screwdriver.

That will probably work too and again, no solvent required.

Wrapping what? The screw or the stem before the handle goes on? Screw for sure isn't going to work. Loctite/polish on the screw threads is way to go.
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On Friday, June 14, 2013 1:51:49 PM UTC-7, snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net wrote:

e!  Couldn't find exact photo on-line, but this may not matter?

***The stem. Thought it would create enuff friction to keep it tight.-

Nail polish on the screw threads is way to go.
You said no solvent required to remove nail polish ???? Sure is required to get it off nails! Clarification, pls, TIA.
HB
OK, how many votes for Locktite and how many for nail polish?-
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"Higgs Boson" wrote in message wrote:

***The stem. Thought it would create enuff friction to keep it tight.-

Nail polish on the screw threads is way to go.
You said no solvent required to remove nail polish ???? Sure is required to get it off nails! Clarification, pls, TIA.
HB
OK, how many votes for Locktite and how many for nail polish?-
I vote for neither. As I said in first reply, Clear silicone. You cannot see it but easy to remove and works good. I also use it on slip joint drain pipes with gasket. Seals good but can be taken apart easy. WW
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ame!  Couldn't find exact photo on-line, but this may not matter?

They are two different strength products. Red is high strength. Blue is regular strength. They color them different so mechanics can tell them apart and use the right one.

You put the Loctite or naipolish on the THREADS OF THE SCREWS. You use a screwdriver to take the screws out. The Loctite just binds it up so that it can't come out as easily, ie it won't loosen up. I would not put loctite on the shaft of the faucet. If solvent were required to get it apart, I don't know how you'd get the solvent into where it needs to go.

I know Loctite works because that's what it's made for. Nailpolish is a similar idea. How much it holds vs nailpolish, IDK.
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Higgs Boson wrote:

Neither it nor the others I suggested will resist a screwdriver. The solvent for nail polish is acerone (nail po;ish remover); lacquer thinner would probably do it too.
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I vote for using nail polish, that saves a trip to the store for the locktite. IF Locktite, I would use the blue, the red may be too strong to be able to remove the handles without damaging the screwdriver slot. But if the handles will not need to be removed for as long as you are in the house, then go for the red loctite.
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Another option is to use an old plumber's trick.
When replacing a washer on a cartridge stem, often the soft rubber washer compresses too much in the middle before the screw actually tightens up.
So, around here it was common for plumbers to put the brass bibb screw through the washer and then use a pair of side cutters to muck up the screw threads immediately on the back side of the washer. That way, as soon as the screw was starting to compress the washer, the mucked up male threads on the bibb screw would enter the female threads of the spindle and the screw would get significantly tighter. That is sufficiently tight to hold the washer firmly in place, but without compressing the middle of the washer all out of shape.
I'm thinking the solution might be to use brass faucet handle screws instead of the stainless steel ones the faucet probably came with, and simply use a pair of wire cutters to muck up the threads of the brass screw only a little. That way, the screw might be a little harder to turn in and out of the spindle, but it won't turn by itself, and therefore the faucet handles won't loosen up.
And, that solution sidesteps Higgs Boson's concern about how to remove the nail polish or Loctite if desired cuz there won't be any nail polish or Loctite invoved.
Any place that sells fasteners will stock or be able to order brass screws for you.
--
nestork


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On Friday, June 14, 2013 11:23:02 PM UTC-7, nestork wrote:

Wow, thanks, guys for these hugely educational comments! Let's hear it for plumbers -- one step down from god.
But, Nestork, remember this is a family group! The below could be read several ways, depending on the depravity of the reader's mind.
*** That way, as soon as the screw was starting to compress the washer, the mucked up male threads on the bibb screw would enter the female threads of the spindle and the screw would get significantly tighter. That is sufficiently tight to hold the washer firmly in place, but without compressing the middle of the washer all out of shape.***
HB

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