Bathroom fan question

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We just did a complete gut renovation of our bathroom and we installed a fan/light combo unit in the ceiling...The bathroom didn't have one before..The plastic duct goes up thru a foot of insulation into unheated attic and over 6 feet to the outside wall to a soffit vent..Now that is just above zero I get a few drops of water dripping from the fan after a shower..Is this normal and if not what did I do wrong ?? Thanks...
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?

Given the cold temperature, it is condensing before the vent can carry out the moisture laden air. You can probably benefit by insulating the vent pipe a bit further or by leaving the bathroom door open a bit to vent some of that moisture into the rest of the house.
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On Sun, 26 Dec 2010 01:14:05 -0500, "Ed Pawlowski"

Is the fan running when this happens?

What is the purpose of the fan anyhow? To keep the mirror from steaming up?
I would leave the fan off, let the room fill with steam, which after I opened the bathroom door, maybe a little bit at a time as I dried off, would escape to the rest of the house, warming it and increasing its humidity, which is usually adviseable in the winter.
No wasted heat. Instead of blowing it up the vent outside where it's not enough to warm the outside.
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I don't even have a fan. Code does not require on if you have a window. We leave the door open a few inches and have never had a problem. I don't see the need to barricade the bathroom just because someone is in the shower. I do, however, have a cute butt so I can understand that others may want to see me naked.
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Ed Pawlowski wrote:

Keep a can of air freshener on the toilet for those who need to cover nature.
--
LSMFT

Simple job, assist the assistant of the physicist.
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I used to live in an apartment with two switches in the bathroom. One controlled the light which had an exhaust fan. The other switch controlled a heater which had a fan to circulate the heat and keep the heater from overheating.
Every single time a guest used my bathroom, they turned on both the light and heater when they entered the room. When they left, they ALWAYS turned the light off but left the heat on. It NEVER failed.
I once got tired of having to run into the bathroom to turn off the heater. I used transparent tape to tape the switch in the "off" position. The first person who used the bathroom tore the tape off so that they could turn the heater on.
When they left the heat on, it was always on a day when the temperature was 80 degrees F or warmer.
After I moved into a house with the same switches, I replaced the heater switch with a timer so people could not leave the heat on for more than 60 minutes. (If I had found a 15 minute timer, I would have bought it instead.)
--
When I am in the kitchen, I often kick one of my cat's balls.
After I kick it, he will sometimes play with it for a few
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On Sun, 26 Dec 2010 08:22:26 -0500, "Ed Pawlowski"

My mother was against ever locking the bathroom door. She said people can slip on the tile floor or even more likely, in the bathtub, and hurt themselves falling onto the hard floor or the hard bathtub, lie there unconscious or unable to unlock the door, and people outside won't be able to help them. I think when she grew up** bathroom door locks were harder or impossible to open from the outside, and even now a lot of people don't know how to open "privacy locks". She said closing the door ought to be enough to keep people from walking in (and I think she would add, even if they did walk in, it wouldn't kill anyone.)
**Actually, until she was 10 or more her family only had an outhouse. I don't think anyone locks the door to real outhouses, as opposed to portapotties.

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mm wrote:
[snip]

My mother insisted on closing the bathroom door when no one was using the bathroom. That made it (closed door) useless as an "in use" signal.
[snip]
--
Mark Lloyd
http://notstupid.us
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On Sun, 26 Dec 2010 19:01:19 -0600, Mark Lloyd

I've been in a lot of homes, more than half maybe, where the bathroom door was shut. I think that's one of the things that would bring up my mother's repeated statement. Our bathroom doors were wide open when no one was using them.
As are mine, but I live alone. -- I've been meaning to get in the habit of unlocking the front door and taking the cordless phone when I go into the unfinished, permanent-floorless attic. One time I knocked over the ladder and had to jump down, which is harder than it sounds because the closet shelf is in the way so I have to move my body forward, but if I do that too much, because of the wall above the front of the closet, I will -- get this -- break my neck**. I didn't' break my neck, and I landed either on the ladder or between its parts, and didn't even break my ankle.
**Third time mentioning this this week.
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I wouldn't quit your day job for a new career in home construction. A fan is required by code in almost every location in the US for two reasons: Odor control for the toilet and moisture control fror the bath/shower. One is an annoyance, the other is essential to keeping mold under control. Letting the room fill with steam over the long run will at a minimum create a surface mold problem and potentially create a problem behind the surface.
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the other is essential to keeping mold under control. Letting the

bull,
open the window in the summer and open the door in the winter.
I've never had bath fans, and have never had mold problems.
Humidity is a good thing to have in the house in the winter.
Bath fans are wasteful of energy and that they are now code in many places is an example of misguided government "help".
Mark
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in summer they are good.
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On 12/26/2010 9:54 AM Mark spake thus:

Bullshit yourself. Just shows how ignorance goes round and round in the world, now aided by high-speed electronic communication networks.
I installed a vent fan in a bathroom for a client this summer, and it was sorely needed. The bathroom was starting to grow mold on the walls--and this was in a tiny bathroom with a large window that could be (and was) opened to let out moisture.
The Panasonic fan I installed uses very little energy; something like 65 watts for the fan. I installed it on a timer (mechanical wind-up timer), so it will always go off automatically. Not a huge energy waster, and performs a very useful function.
Like someone else said here, I wouldn't be too quick to quit your day job to go into home construction.
--
Comment on quaint Usenet customs, from Usenet:

To me, the *plonk...* reminds me of the old man at the public hearing
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On Sun, 26 Dec 2010 13:13:36 -0800, David Nebenzahl

65 watts is not very little. 2, 5, maybe 10 is very little. 65 is as much as a 65-watt light bulb.
You must mean that it's not on long, and that is usually true.

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That ignores the heat lost, as well.

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that's great Dave, yes fans are sometimes a good thing, and if your client needs one/ wants one, great.
My comment was about the code that requires a fan even when not needed.
Someone mentioned that the code does not REQUIRE a fan if there is a window, and that seems reasonable.
Mark
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I learned the hard way not to do this.
In the winter, letting that much moisture out into my home enabled it to condense on all the windows. And that much moisture on all the windows led to mildew all over. Perhaps it's not as cold where you live. But in northern MA where I live, during the winter it's typical for the dew point to drop quite low at night.
A *little bit* of moisture in the winter is a good thing--I will take the towel I used to dry myself off with, and hang it up in my bedroom to let the moisture evaporate off the towel there. But not the kind of steam you get from a hot bath or hot shower.
-- Steven L.
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wrote:

I"m not saying he shouldn't have a fan. And I accept the fan for odor control, although my toilet doesn't smell bad, only my gases on occaions.

I don't believe that. I have a fan in every bathroom because none have windows (and the've all been unplugged or put on their own switch), but prior to living here, everywhere I lived had windows and no fans and no one opened the window in the winter, and they and no evidence of mold, let alone a mold problem.
In the other three seasons, people opened the windows for fresh air, but now that people have AC, this probably applies all year long.
What I think is the case is that a few people have a mold problem so they made a rule to remedy that by requiring a fan in every bathroom without a window and recommending its use by everyone. That is the kind of scattergun solution that is applied to many problems. This is understandable with say, smallpox vaccination, or even measles vaccination, but not here.

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wrote:

No fan in our bathroom - if it gets too humid I open the door, or the window. If it gets too smelly I open the window. Never any mold or mildew problems, and as mentioned before by others - it helps keep the humidity up. We don't have a humidifier on our furnace either.
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Because fans are code doesn't mean they're always needed or even a good idea. My first house always had mold/mildew problems, even with a fan. The fan in our current master bathroom is in the throne room and is pitifully underpowered to clear any humidity in the rest of the bathroom. The room is large enough that humidity has never been a problem. The mirror doesn't even fog over.
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