bath fan exhaust

Does anyone know national codes that restrict where the bathroom fan can be exhausted? I am putting a bathroom into my basement with a toilet and sink only (no bath or shower) and was planning to vent to the outside with 3" ducts (which come with the fan). However, someone mentioned that the exhaust can't be within 4 feet of a window, and I've only got 7 feet total between windows. Does anyone know if this is code for a bathroom fan exhaust, or did I get wrong information? Thanks.
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The building permits office in the place where you live ought to tell you (without charge) what the code requires and whether you need a permit for this change. It seems unwise to seek random opinions when you have already paid (through property taxes) for the answer you need.
--
Don Phillipson
Carlsbad Springs
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I doubt you'll find any national codes on bathroom exhaust fan venting, but your local building dept. can probably set you straight

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On Dec 2, 7:32 pm, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

Here's some food for thought -
Since the moisture, smells, or whatever you are exhausting from the bathroom came from there originally, why would there be a code that says the vent should be 4' from an operable window? It's not like a furnace vent where you would be worried about the flue gases getting into the house.
Of course, codes don't always have to follow logic!
JK
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Thanks for the suggestions. I actually do have a permit already, but I guess I wasn't completely clear on the plans, so when the plans got approved, I'm still not sure that means it'll pass inspection. I have a call into the inspector, but he's hard to get ahold of. Anyway, I think I may have figured out a solution - if I can join the flexible ducting from this fan to another flexible ducting that's already in place and goes up to the roof vent. Can I just buy a rigid duct fitting like a wye or a tee, and connect the flexible ducting to this with hose clamps and proper foil/duct tape? If not, how do I connect two pieces of flexible ducting together? Do they sell special fittings? Thanks again.
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To close the loop in case anyone else ever has this question - I heard back from my local inpsector and he said that there are no codes he is aware of that restrict the placement of a vent for the bathroom fan exhaust, only that it MUST be vented to the outdoors (dryer vents, flue pipes, and other exhausts are a different story though). He also said that I could use 3" or 4" vent pipe, whatever the fan manufacturer recommended to move the amount of air needed, and since this is only a 30 sqft bathroom with no shower or bath, I'm going with a relatively low noise, but also low-power fan. Thanks again to all.
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No code here, only common sense. I am building my own house right now and the inspector has no problem with anywhere. I would avoid soffets though. I would also not use corregated ducting as that collects lint over the years. Do not link vents together or you will get backdraft. Imagine the bathroom backventing into the range hood. LOL. One fan one vent. The code you are thinking of is for furnace and hotwater tank exhaust and even the fresh air intake for the furnace room and HRV - i.e. distance from gas meter.

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I see you got your answer for your original question, but for the above:
Don't try to combine multiple air vents into a single pipe. The flappers (if installed ...) aren't necessarily going to stop recirculating air from one room back into another. Which defeats the whole point, and may lead to other problems.
--
Chris Lewis,

Age and Treachery will Triumph over Youth and Skill
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I just modified a falpper and routed it 20' total in the air, just under second story soffitt.. I removed the the old flapper.
Supplies (all avail at Home Depot):

way only. Cut/ground off flange except 1mm where support swivel pin on sides were, tight fit, but works 100%, set back several inches. There was one on the very inside where thefan is ( I didn't like the look of it), but just to be safe I added this one too.

ribs/nibs. Contruction adhesive and caulk to wall. Sleeve to orig tube.

(or cut slits) set just inside flush ext wall

nuts, washer, and cut out for eavastrough angle

sleeve over end of plastic 45, with screen wrapped around.

Tools Rivet gun Dremel rotary tool (cut downspout to length) and sand plywood jigsaw drill aviation snips (actually you can easily cut this thickness sheet metal with any scissores. seriously, not a problem)
I can remove the ring to change the screen, or remove the elbow from the downspout and (3-vent removed) mounting plate by unscrewing the 4 SS screws and sliding out the plywood. The 1/2"plywood sits flush in the plate. The elbow is cut back about 1" inside and caulked in place, 1/2 SS screw to downspout. Rivets to Al siding, so they are permanent and won't rip the siding, but are easily removed and replaced with a spin or two to the head of the rivet with a drill bit. Careful about rivets &/or screws elsewhere for re&re. Use rivet backing plates for rivetiing platic-.
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