basin wrench can't remove rusted bolts under sink

What alternatives do I have for removing rusted, frozen bolts in a very tight space in the underside of my 1906 porcelain sink? I need to replace the supply lines and faucets to this beauty, but I can't get the bolts off with my basin wrench! I can't get purchase or space to actually wrench. Please guide me to other tools or techniques, short of paying a plumber $32 to enter my house and then charge me whatever the rate would be for the job. Thanks.
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I assume you have already tried WD-40 and/or the other products that can help break rusted connection. Then it would be time to pull the sink and get it to an area that you can work on it.
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KLS wrote:

You talking about the nuts that go around the faucet supply stems? Cut the lines with a Dremel and cutoff disk as close as you can, then a deep socket and extension.
Or just cut the nuts, too. Barring that, take the sink off the wall and then work on it...
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YES!!!
Cut
Great idea; I will try that pronto. I'll also use another poster's suggestion to try Liquid Wrench (he actually suggested WD40, but I get the concept) to try to free up the rust a bit first. If that fails, I'll try your other suggestion:

Thanks for the suggestions, truly. I'll cancel the plumber appt. now. :)
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Concur with the Dremel. This is your best friend when things get stubborn 'up under there'. Fiberglass-reinforced cutoff wheel.
You want genuine eye protection for this one, though. You won't have the greatest control of that Dremel in awkward positions.

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-----BEGIN PGP SIGNED MESSAGE----- Hash: SHA1

You can usually get in there with a 12 point combination/box wrench.
In extreme cases, 12 point box end wrenches can be bent or cut in half to give you more room to turn the nut.
I guess a hammer and cold chisel are out of the question, due to the irreplaceability of the porcelain, should the tool slip. :-)
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--
-john
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I wasn't sure what a basin wrench looked like, so I googled and found this, which has an extendable handle. Would this help by getting your hands below the bottom of the sink so you can get some more force into it?
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If you need a lot of torque use a 1/2" drive heavy duty crowsfoot wrench with a beaker bar - go easy or you could rip the sink off the wall.
A torch always work on rusted nuts - just a little heat will do.
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