Basic advice for an oven bake element house fire (GE JBP24B0B4WH)

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I didn't see the Dave Martindale responses when I wrote the above but his (and those from dpb and Jack and trad) are the ones that command your attention. Read every word of what Dave Martindale just said. Read them again. Look at your parts. Look at your oven. Put two and two together. Then ask more questions if you still have them. Dave covered what happened pretty well.
If all you need is how to replace the element, read Smitty two-bolts and you'll be done in fifteen minutes.
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On Fri, 10 Oct 2008 12:49:54 -0700 (PDT), snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

The WB44T10009 GE broiler element finally arrived (see pic) so we can continue the oven repair help tutorial. http://www.flickr.com/photos/donnaohl/2950288617 /
Warning to others (that I wish someone would have advised me)!
The hole for the temperature sensor screw in the new GE oven broiler heater element is way TOO SMALL!
You have to widen the mounting hole in the new oven broiler heating element for the temperature sensor in order for the screw to take hold. http://www.flickr.com/photos/donnaohl/2950288625 /
The temperature sensor screw itself won't go in no matter how hard you try. So I had to start with a smaller screw and then take progressively larger screws to stretch the hole in the new broiler heating element mounting plate in order to finally fit the original screw in. It has to be just right though, so be careful as it will not mount if you make the mounting hole too wide!
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On Fri, 17 Oct 2008 21:56:12 -0700, Donna Ohl wrote:

Longer term oven repair report.
The only major issue is that the stove top gets super hot now, almost to the point of burning your hands should you touch it, even with just the bake element on at 450 degrees F.
I don't remember the stove top getting that hot before so I'm wondering if the new broiler element is somehow causing the bake element to heat up more than it did before.
Or maybe the "thermostat" (where is it?) is cooked and it's telling the bake element to heat up too much which might be what broke the broil element in the first place.
I dont' think the oven wall insulation is still wet nor that the fire extinguisher powder is causing the oven range top to be too hot, do you?
Anyone ever have a problem with the oven stove top being too hot?
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On Tuesday, October 7, 2008 at 9:47:47 PM UTC-7, Donna Ohl wrote:

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Wow! You get all kinds of advice on the internet! Oven fires are frighten ing no doubt. When the heating element goes, it's a magnesium fire that bu rns at about 5,500F. It looks like the old 4th of July sparklers because t he same thing is burning. The fire starts because an area of the element g ets bumped, cracked or is improperly manufactured and that causes more resi stance at that point which causes more heat at that point. When you get ov er 5,500F it starts a chain reaction that works all the way down the heatin g element until it cracks apart (usually a couple of feet of element get bu rnt before this happens).
Here's a video of the event:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ieslf3aB-KQ

Here's how to fix it:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zgkPWkVUcF8

Probably no need to get a new oven but if you don't do the repair yourself, the service repair man will charge you an arm and a leg to run the oven th rough its paces and verify that all the electrical connections are putting out the proper voltage. So, decide if the $ is worth your peace of mind. Otherwise a new heating element is probably less than $20.
(Amazon.com product link shortened) /ref=sr_1_7?ie=UTF8&qid48333886&sr=8-7&keywords=oven+broiler+e lements
My recommendation is this: MAKE SURE THE OVEN IS 100% off and the circuit breaker to it is off as well. Take out the old element. Inspect the oven for any damaged porcelain (chipped paint) on the interior. If there is no ne you should be good to put the new element in and use your oven. Of cour se use your judgement and if you don't feel you can do the job, hire a prof essional.
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On 11/23/2015 10:02 PM, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

Since the OP was in 2008, I was a bit surprised to find the picture page still there, on Flicker. Really astounding. Wonder what the OP did with the oven, and if it had another fire?
- . Christopher A. Young learn more about Jesus . www.lds.org . .
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