Basement wet bar: wiring and circuit questions

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On Monday, October 5, 2015 at 2:18:39 AM UTC-4, Don Y wrote:

some dope might rinse their plate in this sink on Thanksgiving instead of bringing it upstairs. More conservative answer is yes, it's greywater. D oes that change approach?

uld use it just to wash something instead of hauling it upstairs to the kit chen.


od in the basement.

s that correct? If so, to me, a sump pump is for a whole house dewatering system in the basement. If so, does this (under sink pump) qualify as a su mp pump by the NEC? (Please correct me if I'm wrong).
Thanks for all other comments!
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On Sun, 4 Oct 2015 22:33:33 -0700 (PDT), snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

This is not a kitchen so the only rule you have to follow is the GFCI within 6' of the sink. There is not even a requirement that you have a receptacle but that is your design choice. If this is finished space you still have the requirement for general lighting circuits so you need receptacles along any wall segment more than 2' spaced so you are within 6' of a receptacle without crossing a doorway or similar obstacle. Counter receptacles do not count for this requirement.
You could share an 8 amp pump with ther counter or wall receptacles if you want. (less than half the rating of the circuit). Again that is a design choice. If I was going to share it, I would share it with the lights so you knew right away it tripped. Put the receptacles on another circuit.
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On Monday, October 5, 2015 at 6:15:16 AM UTC-4, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

if space is available in your main panel, be generous with our wiring.
one day your needs wants may change, your better off overbuilding
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On Sun, 4 Oct 2015 22:33:33 -0700 (PDT), snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

receptacle has to be either a 20amp dedicated or a split15. Split15 gets expensive because you need a 2 pole GFCI breaker for each outlet, where you only need a 20 amp GFCI outlet for each using 20 amp circuits. I would put the pump on a separate 15 amp circuit.
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On Mon, 05 Oct 2015 12:11:39 -0400, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

Even in Canada, that only applies to kitchens and since there is no permanently installed cooking equipment, it isn't a kitchen.
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On Mon, 05 Oct 2015 13:53:49 -0400, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

cooking equipment. But get a party goi g with 2 coffee-makers, a hot plate, a crock pot, and an electric frying pan and you will want a few 20 amp circuits, or even more 15s.
Not a code requirement - but if I were putting in a "wet bar" in a rec room or party room, I'd make sure I had enough juice available!!
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