Basement slab weeping/leaking through bottom plate screw holes

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cubby wrote:

right out when the epoxy gets hard with the treads 'tapped' into the now hard epoxy paul oman/progressive epoxy polymers inc
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PAUL OMAN Progressive Epoxy Polymers, Inc.
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On Tue, 29 Jun 2010 15:24:31 -0700 (PDT), Bryan Scholtes

Apparently you drilled all the way thru the concrete to the gravel or soil base. Otherwise why would water be coming out of the concrete if it never did before. Normally you only drill in the depth of the Tapcons, and most concrete slabs are 4 inches or more. I would have only drilled in 2 inches and used Tapcons that are 3 inches long (going into slab 1.5 inches and thru 2x4 which is actually 1.5 inches.
Personally, I'd remove the 2x4s and seal all the holes with epoxy. Then glue the 2x4s to the slab with PL400 or something similar and wait for it to dry before attaching studs. Be sure to apply weight to that 2x4 after you apply the adhesive. Maybe just precut the studs and cram them against the ceiling joists avery few feet to press the adhesive tight.
Just my 2 cents as a retired builder.
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On Jul 1, 3:46 am, snipped-for-privacy@nospam.com wrote:

Sounds like may also be a water accumulation problem below the slab? Maybe proper drainage has been neglected or if there was drainage away from the house it has been damaged or interfered with? Our basement, 40 years ago we installed perforated drains pipes outside and inside of the footings and lots of gravel to a sump in the corner, before the concrete floor was poured and finished. There is a pump in the sump which runs very occasionally. The time to fix any potential water problem is 'now' before doing any work on finishing the basement area. Mould damp and rot are not nice!
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OK, so an update...
I pulled a couple of the bottom plates. Looks like I didn't drill through the slab. I assessed this by trying to drill with a non- masonry bit in a couple of the holes, and they didn't go anywhere. Most of the holes were about 1.5 inches deep. But the plates I did pull were certainly moist underneath.
Over the phone, one local place suggested I look at the height of the first concrete block. He deduced the slab thickness by assuming the slab was as thick as the buried portion of the first concrete block. So that;d be about 4 inches. He also didn't want to come out because he didn't believe I had a problem. He's convinced I need to grade better and do a better job of keeping water away from the foundation.
The second guy is coming by Wednesday night to physically check it out. He believes it's condensation wicking through the slab and expressing itself on the bottom plates. His suggestion was the same as the first guy's, but contingent on stopping by and actually looking at it.
Everything is on hold for now. If I have to install a French drain, I can't afford it. I'll probably pull out the existing framing and scrap the refinish. Maybe I'll insulate above grade and just make the unfinished basement as comfortable as possible.
So we'll see... My situation seems to be unique. It's nowhere else on the Web. I hope this is a reference for people in the future.
Thanks for your help!!!
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It's possible that you have some water under the slab and no vapor barrier. Set some things down on the slab in various places for a few days and then see if it is damp under them. If it has never flooded I don't kown that it would prevent me from finishing it. But I probably would put a good dehumidifier down there. And keep the flooring choice simple.
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jamesgangnc wrote:

Try the classic 'wet concrete' test- tape some 12-18 inch squares of plastic sheeting (visqueen or similar) down in various spots in the basement, and leave for 24-48 hours. If the slab is wicking water, it will quickly become apparent under the plastic.
-- aem sends...
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The actual cost of materials to install french drain in interior is pretty low, that cheap flexible black plastic corrugated drain pipe, a pile of gravel bought at a supply yard, some concrete to replace removed areas of floor, rental of a jackhammer a sup pit and pump some PVC drain pipe.
Its not rocket science a nice DIY project. mostly moving junk most have filling their basements.... you can do one area at a time if thats a issue
but once its done your homes value increases
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