Basement slab weeping/leaking through bottom plate screw holes

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I am finishing my basement. I used Tapcons to secure PT 2x4 to the basement slab.
After a week of heavy rains, I noticed that all the screw holes were weeping water. There was definite circles of moisture (but not standing water) coming from underneath the bottom plate.
So I am in need of expertise.
1. Does anybody know a Twin Cities expert with many years of basement experience? I will pay for expert (and I mean EXPERT) consulting from a grizzled veteran who's seen it all, and can express opinion without bias.
2. I am considering pulling each screw and injecting silicone into the holes, then re-driving the screw. What do you guys think? I was also considering polyurethane foam or epoxy. If I shoot epoxy down the hole, I'll NEVER get those bottom plates off.
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-snip-
What you need to do is eliminate the water under your slab. You are wasting every bit of money and effort you put into that job until your water problem is fixed.

I don't think that epoxy is a good idea--- but why would you ever want to take those bottom plates off?
Jim
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OP postrer needs interior french drain before ANY FUTHER WORK
with a sump draining to a pump or ideally daylight
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What do you think about just a sump pump? I suppose the water table may be the problem, as I've never had any water in the basement, ever, until now.
What would a french accomplish that a sump pump by itself wouldn't? I'm being sincere, I really don't know.
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interior french drain collects water from all over basement area, directed by underground lines to a sump and pump or better a daylight drain its far superior to just a sump and pump which will only collect water from its immediate area.
before finishing basement you really must fix the moisture issue. otherwise mold bad odors etc will ruin your new room.let alone the possiblity of a flood someday:(
as to fix grade redirect downspout drains etc.
i spent over 8 grand doing that with new sidewalks steps etc and 6 months later still had a wet basement....
the interior french drain with sump cost $3500 bucks and i didnt have to do any work, i was the laborer for the 8 grand job without my bck breaking effort it would of been 12 grand:( took most of summer
sure fix obvious issues, but before finishing a basemet install proper drainage.
otherwise one storm can ruin all that work...........
and its far easier to install french drains with a nice open basement with no finished walls etc.
you CANT seal out water all you can do is direct it somewhere else!!
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snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

I still say retro-fit interior french drains are always a last-resort solution. They break the slab-to-footer connection. If water table is high enough, sub-floor drains should go in before slab is poured. I've personally seen one extreme installation, where a rich doctor simply HAD to have a basement even though local water table was high, and every other house in the sub was on a crawl or slab. Whole network of sub-slab perforated tile leading into 2 sump pits, and a doomsday overflow line leading into a precast manhole-size sump in front yard, so silly doctor could go rent a commercial pump and drop it in the hole in an extended power outage, and pump it out into street. Not sure where they thought it would go, other than into the neighbor's yards- whole sub was rather flat.
And yes, you CAN seal out water, with proper prep work as foundation is being built, as slab is poured, and wall sealer and proper footer drains installed before backfill is put in. They do it in swimming pools all the time. All a basement is, is a swimming pool with the water on the outside. That doesn't mean you don't need to grade the yard properly and have good gutters, of course, since nothing is perfect or lasts forever.
--
aem sends...


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around here code requires french drain with every new home built. and exterior french drain too.
far too many wet basement complaints........
and would you really want to remodel a basement into a nice room/s then have water issues a year or two after spending all that money?
the time to fix this is before remodel......
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Did you even read what AEM wrote?

Retrofitting exterior drains and interior would make such a remodel prohibitively expensive and still not guarantee that there wouldn't be problems. As AEM suggested, breaking the slab/footing connection isn't a good thing to do. If you're going to insist on going this far, sell the house and buy one that works for you.
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-snip-

Except this is alt.home.repair - not alt.buy-a-new-house.
Exterior drain could be as cheap as a couple shovels, a pick, a wheelbarrow & 100gallons of sweat. [and probably a couple bottles of naprosyn for the first week or two.]
The cost of a used elephant foot is advisable.
I rented a backhoe when I did the first half of mine. The next section will likely be all handwork. It is only 25 feet long and equipment will make more of a mess than it will save labor.
The point that everyone who has 'been there, done that' is making is; don't waste your money on finishing the basement until it is ready to be finished-- which means getting rid of the water under the slab. If that means moving or abandoning the idea of making that space livable-- then that is what you need to do.
Jim
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Indoor retrofits typically come with lifetime warrantiesand elminate the need for outdoor french drains..... they tend to clog over time anyway. I found some in a gravel bed packed with dirt.
so whats the big deal of breaking the slab footing connection? its replaced with concrete and around here is only a inch or two thick so its not providing much structurally anyway.
It cost me $3500.00 bucks to do a interior french drain, I first spent over 8 grand plus me free labor doing the outdoor drain that ultimately didnt stop the water:(
Lessons learned the hard way, yard looked great, and asseors noticed that too:(
The reason why thos who have been there done that have such strong opinions?
We learned the hard way:(
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refusing to spend 3500 bucks to fix a water problem is insanity on your part.....
if you dont fix it it can cost you 7 grand or more.....
you should try trimming quotes..... makes it look like you dont know what your doing
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wrote:

You're illiterate, too (but that's obvious to everyone here).

You don't, must make you feel right at home.
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On Jul 4, 12:50am, " snipped-for-privacy@att.bizzzzzzzzzzzz"

I trim quotes frequently.......
So do tell if your home needed a new roof would you sell it?
if your hmes gas line developed a leak would you sell it?
if your home needed a paint job would you sell it?
since you claim its always better to sell what is a acceptable fix for you?
I am mfascinated most posters here enjoy fxing up their homes, you appear very unique.
given all this I would NEVER want to live in a flood zone where every heavy rain creates worry will there be 8 feet of water in the basement and a few feet in the living room.......
but thats not what were talking about.......
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wrote:

As do I, ditz.

After telling you to read again, you refuse. Maybe you're not illiterate, just posses a single-digit IQ. That would explain your existence here.
<more from the moron snipped>
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wrote:

Another illiterate speaks.

It is a *huge* job for a home-owner, with all sorts of complications and risks. I'm not against fixing problems, but I would *never* finish this basement off following such a repair. They too often don't work. If there is that much water on the other side of the wall it *will* leak again, sooner or later.

You're as moronic as halliburton.
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Well all those basement waterproofing companies arent doing anything?
amazing since I have met many who were very happy to finally have a dry basement
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wrote:

They're raking a lot of money.

...and many who are not so happy, after spending *thousands*.
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wrote:

Gee ALL new homes here are REQUIRED to have french drain which must add thousands to new home price. so do tell is that all a waste?
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wrote:

Idiot! We aren't talking about *new* homes. You truly are retarded.
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wrote:

no what i am asking is if retrofitting a french drain is a waste that you would sell your home over, then you would go buy a new home with a french drain? and water problems may not show up for years, well past the builders warranty......
so its likely you might trade a otherwise fine home that needed say 5 grand in basment waterproofing for a far costlier new home and pay all that real estate commision just to find you bought a new home with water problems??
how dumb is that?
now perhaps your issue is having finished rooms in a converted basement?
I am not wild about that, generally too little windows, but lots ofb owners do it, and are very happy weith the outcome.
Hey I get it now you must be a realtor thats hurting for sales BE GONE!!
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