Basement ridid insulation

Hello all, I am going to insulate my basement according to the building science document here.. http://www.buildingscience.com/resources/foundations/basement_insulation_systems.pdf It is a full basement.
-1- Do I need to glue up rigid insulation on parts of the foundation that are not going to be framed up for the finish space ?
-2- On the side of the foundation where the garage is, do I need to put rigid insulation on that wall?? It is an attached garage.
Thanks for your time. -Jack
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The local big box retailer (Menard's) sent out a sales flyer recently, that had some rigid insulation, with preformed grooves for furring strip type of nailers, specifically for basement walls.
This would allow for quick installation of the insulation, with the ability to nail up the wall covering.
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Yes, it can be glued or mechanicly fastened, but you do need it. Most fire coes require sheetrockover the insulation even though it is made from material that retards flames.

You still lose heat from that wall. Not as much as an exterior, but it is still a loss. Do it right and save some money.
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I can`t get your link, but I used R 7.2 " foamboard with Tapcons and just painted it for easy removal incase of hidden mold growth. Sealing it may be a nightmare in the future. Painted it looks good. Remember there is 3.5 - 5 - and 7.2R foamboard insulation. Go 7.2 R
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m Ransley wrote:

I doubt if your fire insurance company or local code inspectors are going to like that. Foam insulation does really bad things when it burns.

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Joseph E. Meehan

26 + 6 = 1 It's Irish Math
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Edwin Pawlowski wrote:

This is very important. Do cover ANY foam insulation with drywall. That stuff creates very poisonous gases when it burns. There is a reason this is a code requirement in most areas.

--
Joseph E. Meehan

26 + 6 = 1 It's Irish Math
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In rhode island, they are very, very sensitive now to foam insulation due to the Station fire (which happened about two miles from my house ) Foamular is very different than what they had on the ceiling at the club, but the rules are followed to the letter now.

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Thos idiots use foam for soundproofing and it was not a fire retardant type.
EPS foam and Styrofoam used for insulation is a modified material. It will burn only when there is a source of ignition present. It will go out when the source is removed. It is actually less flammable than may wall decorations and curtains. It gives off carbon dioxide and soot when burned. It is just smart to cover it.
Other rigid insulations may differ, may be more toxic. Ed
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It is usually not wise to insulate an unheated/uncooled space, such as a garage, because natural breathing is slowed down and it stays hotter and colder and might cause condensation. In the case of your basement, it's hard to say because maybe it's a little bit heated or cooled. Look at the Owens-Corning website and call 1-800-get-pink for free advice. -B

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Well Joe and all I have a certification to inhabit. I folowed code
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I read the document, and it appears to be outdated.
If your basement is dry, you can eliminate mold growth with spray in foam. Because it bonds to the walls, moisture from the air does not accumulate and there will be no mold growth. If the thickness of the foam is adequate, moisture will not accumulate on the surface of the insulation itself either!
While spray in foam is not cheap, there are cases where it pays bigtime. Your basement begs for spray in foam!
Since the foam is expensive, you can lay in a thin layer on the wall, place styro shets between the studs and then seal around the edges of the styro with the spray in foam. This saves A LOTTA bucks and makes the spray in foam price very reasonable.
The spray in foam does not burn, so it could be used as a bare wall although building codes might require a wall covering.
Investige the profoam.com site, especially the r value myth and the case study documents. They opened my eyes andn I've seen the light.
To do the job yourself, you can buy the faom in tanks and install it easily although it will cost slightly more to do it this way. It does free you from using contractors however:>:
Art in Maine
ky1k aatt pivot ddoott net

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