Basement Plumbing Rough-In question

I've posted this question to a couple of plumbing forums also but thought I'd see if anyone here could answer me too?
Our builder put in our plumbing rough-in and I have two questions about what is the usual and customary way to do this.
We were left with just the pipe stub sticking out of the concrete for the shower and toilet pipes The toilet pipe is 3" white plastic, PVC probably?
There is no space around it to add the toilet flange? This seems like a stupid way to leave a rough-in if we have to bust up the concrete floor to put the flange in? Is this the customary way a basement rough-in is done on new construction? Is there a way to add the toilet flange without busting the concrete or raising the toilet?
Also, I'm going to contact the builder because the distance from the toilet rough-in to the tub/shower drain is too close to meet the code of 15" clear space from the center of the toilet to the edge of a standard tub (the way the rough-in is supposed to be laid out. Finally in order to place the vent pipe inside the same wall running behind the toilet, it only leaves 11.5" of space to the back of the toilet and as I'm sure you know 12" is the required amount of space. I think we could squeeze a toilet in here, but the flange is an issue as is the distance from the shower/tub
Thank you for any advice in advance, Kim
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crohnie mom wrote:

There *is* a flange which will drop *inside* the 3" pipe. Makes for a reduced cross-section but they do work. The flange should sit on top of the finished concrete.
For the clearance issue you might consider an offset flange.
http://www.plumbingsupply.com/images/offset_closet_flanch.jpg
This one fits on the outside of 3" pipe and offsets 1 1/2". Make 4 pluge cuts with an abrasive saw in the concrete and excavate around the pipe to accept the flange.
Jim
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Thanks, I had found an offset flange and realized it would solve the problem, but am hesitant to cut the concrete floor myself. I'm not sure I like the idea of exposing the floor from moisture from below? Also having PVC pipe underground, I'm worried about damaging it in the process. We're fairly competent diy's but this makes me nervous, it seems like the best solution, though.
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When mine was roughed in the toilet drain pipe was actually just below the floor level. Closed off with some rags and then a skim coat of cement over the pipe. Stayed that was for about 2 years, out of the was and then real easy to get at when I started to finish off the bathroom. MLD
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When I roughed in my basement bathroom, I glued the flange for the toilet on the pipe and set it to the height that the finish poured floor would be. The top of the flange ended up pretty much flush with the finished floor. I left my 2" sink drain pipe stick a good 36" out of the finished concrete. I can cut and vent when I install the bathroom.

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I would presume this piping was layed in the basement or on a concrete slab right?
The offset pipe will do the trick. As for cutting the concrete, dont be afraid of it. If you arent comfortable with cutting it away, you can also use a chisle and hammer. It will take awhile longer but with care it really isnt that bad of a job. Actually its probably less messy because a dry concrete blade creates LOTS of dust!
So just break up some conrete, do your plumbing work and pour a little concrete in to clean things up nice.
Project done
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Yes, the house is 7 months old and the builder rough-in includes a 2" vent 3" toilet pipe, 2" shower pipe. The toilet and shower PVC pipe stubs were left sticking directly out of the concrete in the basement. Unfortunately they didn't think to wrap the Toilet pipe with any spacing material to allow for the flange to be fit onto it. Kim
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crohnie mom wrote:

my toilet pipe was flush to the floor as well with no space. Somehow the plumber did it that way, and the installer never gave it a 2nd thought. I think thats how its supposed to be. Anyway, the installer was putting in floor tile and created a sub-floor on top of the cement, and the flange was installed just atop the new subfloor.
--
Thank you,


CL Gilbert
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