Basement pipes (from well) wet when humid. What to do?

Is there a fix for this? Condensation is dripping all over the cold water pipes (from the well) in my basement during humid weather. Its not just the pipes but the filter tank too. Should I just wrap them up in insulation, or can I add a small pipe heater or something like that to take the chill off?
I wrapped up the system in my previous house, but it seemed to just spread the problem further along the plumbing system, presumably because the cold water was never warming up in the insulated part.
Any help appreciated.
Dean
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Sounds like you might want to run a dehumidifier in the basement. I had the same problem and that cured it.
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basement is 70' x 25', so its gonna need quite a lot of dehumidifier electricity.
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Coupled with insulation, it should fix the problem. Unfortunately, there is no cheap way to change the laws of physics.
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Or an exhaust fan with a differential humidistat.
Nick
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Nick,
You seem to love exhaust fans. It depends on where he is and the humidity levels outside. If the dew point of the air outside is higher than the surface temperature of the pipe im question, what you suggest will not work. In fact, you will make it worse! Use a dehumidifier or insulate the pipes or wrap them with heat tape. The heat tape idea will work if the water flow rate is not too high. Try self regulating heat temp. It is available in many temperatures and watt densities.
Stretch
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This one would have a differential humidistat that runs the fan when woutdoors < wbasement.

That seems unlikely to me. I think we need a new word now, "dryth."
Most basements and houses can store dryth.
Then again, we have Key West.
Nick
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Shouldn't. Unless the basement is REALLY wet, a 45 pint/day unit (not that big) will do it easily. I have a basement that is 37' x 100', and it keeps it bone dry (here in New England). Pipes don't drip anymore, either. YMMV
dean wrote:

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What about wraping a heating wire around the pipe to warm the water. They are used on exposed pipes in my area to prevent freezing. TB
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Insulation is simple, cheap, effective and has zero operating cost.
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Much of the heat tape is set to only heat slightly above freezing. It is not hot enough to ekkp down the condensation. YOu can get some heat tape to go to about any temperature you want but you will have to look for it. You still have to insulate the pipe with the heat tape.
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Greetings,
dehumidifier ==============Running a dehumidifier would work -- but would cost a very large amount of money through the years.
heat tape =============Heat tape might not work! This is because when you are flowing cold water the heat tape will have very little time to warm the water. It also costs money and is an ongoing expense.
pipe insulation ============Pipe insulation WILL WORK but you might have to insulate the entire run of pipe. You could start with your basement and see how much it helps but if you are getting condensation elsewhere you will need to wrap those areas as well.
Hope this helps, William
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Only you know the actual cost/benefit of a fix.
Not knowing whether you're near Miami, or Bismarck, it's easy to suggest that you carefully fit, _and_seal_, the highest R-value insulation you can find. On _both_ the hot and cold runs. Done right, you only have to do it once.
Depending on where you are, and the other consequences of humid basement, you may want to put effort into ventilating bsmt also. Including blocking moisture entry.
HTH, John
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dean wrote:

Several suggestions. My take on it: You actually have two problems.
1. Excess humidity in the basement: Either cure that or live with it, I live with it as it isn't harming anything. YMMV
2. Condensate dripping from pipes: Insulate the pipes - cheap, effective solution for that problem. Or ignore it as I do as again it isn't hurting anything. Of course mine is not a major drip, your's might be. Mine is not a living area and again your's might be.
As for heat tapes or other methods of warming the pipes - what does that do that insulation won't do much cheaper and probably better?
Harry K
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