Basement interior perimeter drainage system ?

I am dealing with a wet basement and looks like I will need to install a remedial interior perimeter french drain system leading to a sump. I know that I can use sock covered perforated pipe and gravel but I have heard that some of the local big waterproof contractors are using this labor saving modular no gravel system (or something like it) http://www.j-drain.com/pbasement.htm but I wonder it it is as good .
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rkpatt wrote:

It looks like it would work the same and cost more.
You are aware that fixing the problem before it gets inside is the right way of addressing the problem and you have considered such alternatives and have decided that they are not practical?
--
Joseph E. Meehan

26 + 6 = 1 It's Irish Math
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Yes, do everything to keep the water away from the house, like regrade the yard if necessary. Would the Titanic have fared better by channeling the water into a sump, or by preventing the water from coming in? A guy wanted a $10K interior drain system, but I caulked a crevice on his patio and cleaned the gutters, and it's been dry for a year. -B

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On 29 Oct 2004 05:45:04 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@my-deja.com (rkpatt) wrote:

Before you spend a lot of time on this. . . . I started an interior perimeter drain a year ago. [100 yr old house, stone foundation, 6' ceilings, clay soil- basement has been damp forever]
End of last July God had enough and sent 4 inches of rain down in a couple hours. 2 walls of the basement collapsed. My insurance company doesn't cover hydrostatic pressure so the job was on my dime.
But now-- $6000 & a thousand man-hours later my cellar has a footing, parged/tarred/insulated block walls and an 8' ceiling . . . the outside is regraded and for what that misses an *exterior* perimeter drain takes away. [I couldn't resist also putting in an interior drain, but it is dry so far]
I'm leaving the sump holes until next spring, but from the looks, I might fill them in. The basement is already dry enough [and high enough] for a rough workbench-- and next summer might see the beginnings of some living space down there.
Save your money and effort and get the water before it gets into your house.
Jim
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