Basement insulation in SC

I have a new (1 year old) house in upstate South Carolina (warm humid summers, mild winters with a few days below freezing). Has a walkout basement, and I want to finish it. But as I am researching correct methods, it seems that I get contradictory information from presumed experts. The basement has the following conditions: 1. The concrete block walls to the front and concrete block half walls to the side. There is an external basement waterproofing system, but I don't know what type. 2. The back wall is framed, with batt insulation and house wrap under the siding. So my questions are: 1. Do I put vapor barrier against the concrete, before the new wall? or does it go to the inside face? When I read the incredibly long and detailed manual from some Canadian group, it recommended both. And does the recommendation change for a wall of a bathroom? 2. Am I better off with a conventionally framed wall with batt insullation a few inches in front of the concrete (due to pipe that would be difficult to move, it would have to be about 5-6 inches in from the concrete), or using furring and styrofoam panels attached to the walls (which would allow me soffitt in the pipe on the ceiling). I'm speaking strictly in terms of making sure I don't get a water problem, without regard to the other plusses and minuses of 2x4 walls vs furring. 3. Should I put vapor barrier over the batt on the framed exterior walls in the back of the basement ? 4. I intend to leave a few rooms in the basement unfinished. Is there anything special I need to do on the walls between the finished and unfinished areas. Lots of questions, but any help would be greatly appreciated.
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Vapour barrier alwas goes on the warm side (interior side) of the insulation. Do this on all exterior walls. Here in Alberta, Canada we have to at least insulate and vapour barrier all exterior basement walls to satisfy our building permits. Even if we are not finishing the walls. I'd suggest the same for you.. frame all the exterior walls and insulate. It will pay in both comfort and energy. We tend to get some wicked winters here also :) I prefer frameing all the walls 2x4 which allows an R-12 (4") of insulation.
As far as that Pipe thats out from the wall. you don't have to frame that far out.. you can go down to your building supply and purchase a cover.. like a telepost MDF cover.. rounded or square.. or you can make your own.. either an MDF box (most durable), or frame around it and drywall it.
Cheers
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Your local building permit office will tell you all this. I received a hardcopy guide from my county intended specifically for homeowners finishing their own basements. It was quite handy.
Basically, you'll want 2x4 framed walls, R11+ insulation, and a continuous vapor barrier "on the warm side of the wall".
Even if the codes allow furred walls, don't. Just don't. I can send you photos of what it'll look like in 35 years.
There are codes on the unfinished space. The under side of stairs must be drywalled and each room must have a light. There should be an outlet near the furnace. It's all in the code book.
-rev
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See building science website. really good information
http://www.buildingscience.com/resources/basements.htm
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The buildingscience website really does have great info. But again, this just confirms the confusion. This site strongly recommends the foam insulation boards, with furring strips or a 2x4 wall built directly in fromt of it. Absolutely discourages the vapor barrier use on either wall.
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In coastal SC, the code now says not to use any vapor barrier. I will have to check for upstate SC, but I believe it is the same. In Canada, you want the vapor barrier on the "Warm in winter side" In the deep south, you want the vapor barrier on the "Warm in summer side"
It all depends on your climate.
Stretch
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