Basement foundation tile drainage issue figured out

After having a person I called to fix a floor crack try to sell me a internal foundation drainage system and saying the crack was from hydrostatic pressure. Then callin in a plumber that found 4 of the 6 foundation drainage cleanouts had sand in them. Then calling a plumber to snake out the drains, to no avail. then vacuuming out the sand I could see and snaking the drains again myself. Then pouring food coloring into the drain to discover they actually flow freely. Then calling in the plumber to use a pipe camera, I have finally the answer to my basement condition.
Four of the six pipes were laid incorrectly with an uphill slope. This means these 4 pipes are holding water and sand. This means these 4 sections of the basement have a water level elevated by 3.5". This is why the cement we put down has a moisture line at the seam.
I was told the plumber could fix it at $95 per foot. Thats a lotta dollars for a 2.5 year old house I have owned for 1.5 years.
Im going to talk to the builder about this. Its under warranty but I really dont want a big legal fight. I would be happy if 2 of the 4 were fixed though they should really fix them all...
I really dont have hydrostatic pressure buildup since the pipes do drain, they just have elevated water level, AND probably the sand is from erosion due to the weeping tiles being full of water due to the uphull grade of the drain pipes under the foundation. So even if I had a small amount of drainage, the tiles wouldn't drain until they were full which they are. Plus I will have to keep vacuuming the sand out since it will be 'trapped' by the uphill slope. Plus my basement floor has a moisture line where we cut the cement.
Any tips on the extend of having the tile drain pipes going uphill once inside the house? How much harm is this going to do? Any other advise?
--
Respectfully,


CL Gilbert
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
"CL (dnoyeB) Gilbert" wrote:

....
Water won't run uphill...if they don't drain, they won't do any good when you're really going to need them...
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Duane Bozarth wrote:

I should have been more specific. From the cleanout to the sump pit the pipe goes up, and then down. So any water I pour in gets to the sump pit since the pipe doesent go up too high to completely stop the flow.
But thats a good point. I should check the flow in the other 3 pipes to ensure they dont go up too high either. But I doubt they do, else the water would raise out of the cleanout and onto the floor.
I did check one of the others and it flowed too. so I only need to verify the other 2.
--
Respectfully,


CL Gilbert
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.