Basement drains in older house - where do they go?

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I have 2 basement drains in my house. It looks like at one time a washer and dyer was down there. They do not appear to be hooked to my septic tank. Where would these go?
I am thinking of adding a 1/2 bath in the basement and wonder if I can use them
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First guess is a sump pit. Second guess is a dry well.

Not if they don't go to to a septic system or a sanitary sewer.
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On Dec 2, 10:07 pm, snipped-for-privacy@milmac.com (Doug Miller) wrote:

Any clue how I can figure out where they go?
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Any clue how I can figure out where they go?
They make dye for this. Pour in some dye and go watch for it to appear in the sewer pipe in the street at a downstream manhole. If no dye appears then your drains are not connected to the sewer.
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I don't have sewer lines. Only a septic system.
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You obviously have to access the line to the septic system. In mine, I have a downstream box to switch grey water to separate leach field if needed and access is easy for me. I would think if access is difficult, you could call your septic guy out to pump tank and he or you could simultaneously run dye test.
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I can see the main line from the house that runs to the septic. it is 4 foot up from the basement floor. So line from the basement probably do not run to the septic. I need to find the septic tank, I am not even sure where or what it looks like. I have no indications of an access cover in the yard. The septic is probably pretty old
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-snip-

Might be a good idea to check it out before you add more plumbing. I just ran across an interesting site that you might find informative- http://www.inspect-ny.com/septic/septankfind.htm
Jim
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Finding one can be a problem. Most systems have the cover completely buried down a foot or so.
Can you contact the previous owner? That would be the simplest.
If not, then the tank _should_ be in a direct line with the pipe you can see exiting the basement. A thin metal prob inserted repeatedly every few feet on that line should trace out the pipe until you come to the tank itself. Works best if the ground is damp.
Harry K
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The man clearly stated he's on a septic tank.
s

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For your purposes it doesn't matter where they go if it isn't the septic. Pop the cover- have someone pour a bucket of water in the drain. When it doesn't come sloshing into the septic you know you need to rethink the 1/2 bath.
You might not even need to pop the cover. If your septic isn't too deep- go stand by it and see if you can hear a toilet flush. If you can, then repeat with bucket in drain.
Jim
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you can buy a toilet with a macerator grinder pump, no need to rip up floor, pump small waste line to convenient main sewer line, pump toilet has inlet for sink too.
problem solved
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you obviously have never had a septic system. They don't have covers you can 'pop' as a rule. AND they are always full, so you'd never see water 'slosh' into the tank. Unless you were having it pumped and happened to try the test whilst the tank was empty. Also, they don't make noise whilst standing next to them.
steve

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I've never had anything but a septic system. If there is no cover on yours how do you pump it out? And I can hear water run into my tank when a toilet flushes.
The inlet is higher than the outlet by design.
Jim
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wrote:

When I was a kid we had a septic tank and we never had to have it pumped while we lived there, which was at least 7 years, maybe 10 years. I believe it had a cesspool as well as a septic tank, at least that was what everyone said. The water flowed first into the cesspool where the crap settled out but the water overflowed into the septic tank where it filtered down into the ground. The septic tank was about 4 times as big as the cesspool as I recall. Cesspool probably 2 or 3 feet in diameter, not sure how deep. I never heard any noises come from it.
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Jim Elbrecht wrote:

No need to rethink the 1/2 bath, it just may take a bit more work and cost to tie into the septic line, or if below grade, to install one of the small pump tanks designed for below grade bathrooms.
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Okay, the line goes out four feet from the basement floor, so the tank "cap" is likely a little above that line. But the floor drain is obviously below that point, going into a dry well. And your perimeter drains may well go into it, too, if you don't have a good spot for them to deliver to the surface away from the house. If you really want to put in the 1/2 bath, and decide after due consideration to put in a macerator pump, it would only add about $500 to the project, and the floor drain could be left alone to catch an "overflow" onto the floor. But if you go the macerator route, make sure the unit is NSF approved and is installed in a rather inconspicuous way. And I suggest an audible warning if the unit gets too full. After all, it's sorta like a sump well, but more difficult if it stops working without you knowing it. No need to consider a "dye test" with indocyanine green.
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theedudenator wrote:

If it is like my house my wash water goes to a separate system, commonly known around here as a dry well. Mine was built by a previous owner. I would never consider hooking up a half bath to it.
As someone else suggested pop the cover on your septic and do the bucket test. Five gallon bucket would probably work best.
Chris
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hmmmmmmmm............. another guy who's never been on a septic system.....
s

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As Steve said, the bucket test won't work on a septic tank system unless you pump it first. Also, in order to 'pop the cover' in most septic systems it will take at least an hours work digging the 'cover' out by hand before you can 'pop' it
Harry K
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