baseboard repainting

I have a section of baseboard I want to repaint. It has a lot of contours (in and out; I don't know the correct nomenclature but its sorta fancy looking) and I want to sand/scrape it first but ordinary sandpaper or a putty knife won't do it well. What are practical choices to sand/scrape the old paint before repainting it? I just thought of a hand wire brush or perhaps a wire brush (??) that is on the end of a drill bit but I'd like to know what the pro's would use.
thanks.
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Your best results would be from stripping it and scrubbing with a brass brush (resembles a large toothbrush. Be certain to remove all stripper before recoating. Light sanding of the smooth areas will also help, as many strippers raise the grain.
I remove the baseboard first, as it is easier to work on that way, but you have to be careful not to ruin the board when you are removing it, as many of the older baseboards with contours are difficult to find and expensive. Glue will often solve some problems, like splitting.
doug wrote:

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If you're just cleaning/scuffing the surface, go out and buy the 3M sanding sponge -- about 1" thick and a bit bigger than a deck of cards. It has sanding material on 4 sides.
The corners will get into the grooves and contours. They wear fairly quickly-- the 'medium' ends up a 'fine', and the 'fine' ends up like 220 sandpaper. If they're too stiff to start, break them in by sanding the flat areas [using all 4 sides]. If you're doing all the base in a large room, I'd get two.
Anything heavy -- wood putty, big paint runs -- use sandpaper. Just tear it in half widthwise, and fold each piece in half, twice, once each way. That'll give you the folded edges you'll need to do the grooves.
On Jul 19, 3:45 pm, doug wrote:

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