Baseboard reattach

At the church, someone knocked off about 6 inch length of varnished wood baseboard. The mating surface is some kind of goop that didn't hold. Behind that is wall paper, and some bare drywall.
At the end, the wooden ends are bevelled, and match up to another bevelled, varnished wood.
My bottle of gorilla glue had locked up. I went to Home Depot, and bought a tube of Seal All, which I can use for other stuff after the baseboard. I'm not all sure this will stick.
What works better? Liquid nails? Silicone caulk? Or should I bought fresh bottle of gorilla glue?
Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus www.lds.org .
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Any particular reason why the normal technique of nailing isn't appropriate here?
Art
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Yes. Behind the drywall, is cinderblock. Would take some intense nails.
Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus www.lds.org .
wrote:

Any particular reason why the normal technique of nailing isn't appropriate here?
Art
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Please accept my apologies. I really need to have posted a photo. I didn't provide complete information, and it shows in the replies. Anyone have a free photo hosting to reccomend?
The bottom two inches or so, is carpet that is glued to the wall. The baseboard doesn't actually go down to the floor level.
Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus www.lds.org .
Simplest cure: 1: Cut out the bottom edge of the drywall, say 1.75 inches high, the thickness of a 2x4. 2. Fasten to the cinderblock (with glue or concrete anchors) a block of wood deep enough to fill the space between the cinderblock and the papered surface of the drywall. 3. Replace baseboard, nailed into the wood. It can be replaced when redecorating. (I assume the baseboard stands more than 1.75" high.)
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Stormin Mormon wrote:

I use this: http://tinypic.com/.
It's free, no sign-up or password to figure out and remember, etc.
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I hope this works. http://tinypic.com/r/24eq4np/6
<a href="http://tinypic.com?ref$eq4np" target="_blank"><img src="
http://i50.tinypic.com/24eq4np.jpg " border="0" alt="Image and video hosting by TinyPic"></a>
http://i50.tinypic.com/24eq4np.jpg" target="_images" rel="nofollow">
http://i50.tinypic.com/24eq4np.jpg">
http://i50.tinypic.com/24eq4np.jpg

One of those oughta work.
Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus www.lds.org .
Stormin Mormon wrote:

I use this: http://tinypic.com/.
It's free, no sign-up or password to figure out and remember, etc.
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Stormin Mormon wrote:

That link works for me.
Instead of glue, couldn't you use a couple of very small finish nails to tie in the 90-degree corner and maybe a finish nail (or a little glue) to toenail or tie in the end that goes against the door trim? I would probably pre-drill to holes for the 90-degree corner to prevent splitting, and maybe do the same on the end that attaches to the door trim.
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You know, great idea, finishing nails. At the moment, the wood is held on with some Seal All, from Home Depot. I'll pilot hole with a brand new bit, and use a couple finishing nails from wood to wood, if this comes loose again. Some glue, and clamps. Thanks, great idea.
I can run a board from point A to point B, and use a furniture clamp on backwards, and press on the baseboard.
Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus www.lds.org .
Stormin Mormon wrote:

That link works for me.
Instead of glue, couldn't you use a couple of very small finish nails to tie in the 90-degree corner and maybe a finish nail (or a little glue) to toenail or tie in the end that goes against the door trim? I would probably pre-drill to holes for the 90-degree corner to prevent splitting, and maybe do the same on the end that attaches to the door trim.
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On 8/2/2012 12:57 PM, Stormin Mormon wrote:

i would use liquid nails. silicone would take a good 24 hours to fully cure, and isn't that good of an adhesive anyway.
gorilla glue is best used for wood->wood gluing.
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Thanks, that might be exactly what's needed.
Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus www.lds.org .
i would use liquid nails. silicone would take a good 24 hours to fully cure, and isn't that good of an adhesive anyway.
gorilla glue is best used for wood->wood gluing.
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On Aug 2, 6:02pm, "Stormin Mormon"

Agree with the liquid nails or similar construction adhesive. I'd go sparingly with it, a few dabs in areas where there is bare drywall. I think you have a better chance of a tight fit as opposed to silicone which remains soft and has give.
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I vote for the liquid nails.

baseboard doesn't actually go down to the floor level.
*Thinking out loud: I'm wondering how they attached the drywall to the cinder blocks! Liquid nails? They likely used a 2" spacer, on the floor, to install the drywall 2" off the floor, for the subsequent carpet to ride up the wall, that way. Interesting! I wonder if the church was built with the help of members of the congregation, ^5, so maybe the floor wasnt exactly level. This may help explain the need(?) for that 2" offset.... otherwise, it was just part of the design.
Sonny
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On 8/2/2012 3:44 PM, chaniarts wrote:

Gorilla glue has its place, but requires some serious clamping. I wouldn't think of using it on this problem.
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On 8/2/2012 2:57 PM, Stormin Mormon wrote:

Go to an auto parts store and buy some weatherstrip adhesive. Make sure it says 3M - do NOT buy the cheaper store brand. They have black, clear, and the original yellow. Functions a bit like contact cement with extra body. A really useful weapon in a maintenance arsenal. I would be VERY confident of it holding your wood block.. Be careful not to get it on surfaces that show and use sparingly - a little goes a long way.
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You know, I'd never thought of that. At the moment, the piece is held on with Seal All, used as contact cement. But, who can tell how long that will hold?
Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus www.lds.org .
Go to an auto parts store and buy some weatherstrip adhesive. Make sure it says 3M - do NOT buy the cheaper store brand. They have black, clear, and the original yellow. Functions a bit like contact cement with extra body. A really useful weapon in a maintenance arsenal. I would be VERY confident of it holding your wood block.. Be careful not to get it on surfaces that show and use sparingly - a little goes a long way.
--


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