Baseboard gaps

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RicodJour wrote:

Shoe molding on the inside is like ivy on the outside; it's main purpose is cover mistakes, miscalculations, or disguise the fact that the job was done on the cheap. It's something you see in trailer houses. You ain't gonna find any shoe-molding in the Elysee Palace!
Removing the baseboards is not for little, cheap ones. It's the expensive, detailed baseboards that thrive when removed.
In addition to being able to do a better job refinishing the floor, removed baseboards are just sitting there, begging to be rehabilitated. You can fill in the dents, re-sand, and repaint in about an hour. Try returning baseboards to a pristine condition while they're attached. Bah!
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On Wed, 16 Feb 2011 07:54:16 -0800 (PST), RicodJour

By "shoe molding" do you mean 1 1" quarter-round? Almost standard equipment with 5" or higher base-boards for MANY years
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On Feb 16, 5:07 pm, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

Nope - not what I meant. Shoe molding is shoe molding, not quarter round. Further up in this thread someone mentioned shoe molding, and that it is taller than it is wide. Shoe molding is usually 1/2" x 3/4" with the taller leg vertical.
http://www.woodfloorsonline.com/techtalk/mouldings-outlines2.gif
I think some people think that any small profile at the bottom of the baseboard is a shoe molding, because, well, shoes do usually go at the bottom of things, and some people call quarter round shoe molding. If you go to a good lumberyard or millwork house and ask for shoe molding, you'll get the unequal leg length stuff. If you go to Home Depot and ask for shoe molding you'll get blank stares. ;)
Shoe molding looks far better than quarter round - quarter round looks too squat and projects out farther than it needs to. I don't think I've ever seen 1" quarter round on any floor/baseboard anywhere. I think 3/4" quarter round looks too heavy, even on 8" baseboards. Opinions vary.
When you get to the really large baseboard stuff, the "shoe" molding might be another piece of more typically scaled baseboard. It's good to be King!
R
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On Wed, 16 Feb 2011 15:57:14 -0800 (PST), RicodJour

Around here (Waterloo County, Ontario) quarter round was common on a very large percentage of homes built before the late sixties, and is still seen in some higher end "colonial" or "Ontario Farmhouse"style homes. The shoe molding shown in the link is virtually unheard of here - 3/4" QR is relatively common, and 1 " was VERY common.
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RicodJour wrote:

You neglected to mention in your description that installed shoe molding makes the entire room look like hammered shit.
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cubby wrote:

The best solution would ave been to keep the adjacent floor boards even and level when laying. That wasn't done so your options are shoe, caulk (ugh, IMO) and scribe.
If you do the latter, your life will be easier if you first cut the base board bottom so it slopes up to the back...less to plane/sand off that way.
--

dadiOH
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wrote:

That's a real good idea. One pass on the saw. Personally, if I rejected shoe, I would caulk. Careful caulk selection so it blends with the base, careful application so the line is clean. Nobody would ever notice - except me. (-:
--Vic
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