Barn Neutral Saga Continues (Was Bizarre Electrical)

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On Fri, 6 Nov 2015 14:14:45 -0500, "Ralph Mowery"

lbs. Most Commercial grade ladders are grade1 at 250 lb, while most heavy duty home ladders are grade 2, rated at 225 lb while budget ladders are grade1 with a weight rating of only 200 lb.
The whole inspection sticker thing started with ISO9000 certification, and then spread from there with the requirement to have workplace health and safety committees and procedure manuals indicating how you were ensuring safe workplace practices were put in place and monitored.
Totally useless as they are generally inplemented - as you say, a monkey could do the inspection as long as he knows which side of the sticker is the sticky side.
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On 11/05/2015 6:42 PM, Ralph Mowery wrote:

I'll be they were all half- or third- of my age, too!!! 30 yr ago I'd had no problem still doing that roof, either; even 20 would have been possible. Now, it's just not in the cards w/o the crutch of the lift as a backstop if nothing else.
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On 11/05/2015 6:38 PM, snipped-for-privacy@unlisted.moc wrote: ...

Not that big actually as compared to a modern tractor or combine...most of that weight is in the counterweight--at 40-ft, there's a sizable moment arm you got's to counteract...
The JD 8400 is just under 20,000; the 9660STS combine is 30,000+ w/o the header (that part on the front that does the actual cutting) plus 250 bu wheat when the bin is full is 15000 lb if it's only test weight of 60 lb/bu; it often runs test weights greater than that.
So, the lift is pretty small stuff in the overall scheme of things... :)
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On 11/05/2015 6:35 PM, dpb wrote: ...

I was going to attach the following link...
<http://www.ritchiespecs.com/specification?type=&category=Combine&make=John+Deere&model –60+STS&modelid1471>
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header. I think the grain bin is about the same size.
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Using Opera's mail client: http://www.opera.com/mail/

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On 11/05/2015 7:29 PM, Dean Hoffman wrote: ...> I looked at Deere's site. An S650 is about $366,000 without header. I

Finding one w/ low hours returned off lease is _much_ more economical... :) Still uncheap, however.
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I knew those combines were heavy, but never imagined they weighed that much. Today's farm equipment is so darn big compared to the older stuff. I often wonder if they really need such big equipment, but I know they are doing many acres and need to do it quickly. How they can afford that stuff is another matter????
I live on a small farm, and most of what I do is just small scale compared to these modern farms. Since I'm retired, I dont intend to expand. I have 2 old tractors. A Farmall M and an Allis D17. Small tractors compared to the modern stuff, but in their day, they were top of the line and did all the work for a whole farm. But back then most farms were less than 100 acres. Yet, I can bale hay with what old machinery I have and that's really all I do as far as crops. It's just feed for my own animals.
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On 11/06/2015 5:59 AM, snipped-for-privacy@unlisted.moc wrote: ...

I did thousands of acres of row crop (milo grain sorghum) w/ an Allis D17 and 4-row lister(*) back in those days...we were farming just over 1000 A then but during farming season with brother and myself and a hired and plus Dad we were never caught up...that was about average for out here then; it takes much more than that now to have a chance.
The size is mandatory now; for commodity crops such as the small grains that are what are suitable for the area it takes a lot of volume to make a viable operation and the size is the only way to have the capacity to cover that much ground. "Farming without a profit motive is gardening." :)
(*) Geezer alert: We planted as above with 4-row, knifed 6 and harvested 5; you had to drive straight and even rows or the loss in the next step was unacceptable. No GPS then, either!!! :) The tool bar on the lister was so short I one time by chance came out at the end of the row by the power line pole such that I was able to just kiss one side and turn around and set the next row right in line w/o any veering around the pole. On Sundays on way home after church Dad would generally drive around the section checking on work; that day we drove by that field had just finished planting and I was waiting for the reaction...Nothing!!! Then the car stops, backs up and he says--how'd you do that??!!! :)
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The future will be worse after they require all crops to have a UPC code label grown into each ear of corn, and on all fruits and vegrtables. :)
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On 11/06/2015 5:59 AM, snipped-for-privacy@unlisted.moc wrote: ...

Already mentioned the Allis; there was a time we used M's as well but I was still just young enough didn't do much more with them than take the manure spreader from one spot to another--most of the time I was filling it. :(
From the days of mules, grandfather's first tractor was a Twin City 10-20; the original manual and sales ticket is still around. In the late '20s and early '30s prior to the Dust Bowl era was a very good weather cycle and he expanded significantly. They transitioned to using Caterpillar Model 22's for all the row crop work pulling a three-row JD lister and cultivator. These were the cutest little things; 22 drawbar horsepower, about mid-chest tall and 8" tracks. Big, solid cast iron radiator housing and the flat fenders; looked just like an early large Cat that had been left out in the rain and shrank! :)
We still had one of them thru my high school days that had been converted to have a bucket on it. Dad ended up selling it to a fella' in town who's son is now in WY and has it fully restored. I'd looked a time or two to find one but haven't ever bit the bullet...
Anyway, from there transitioned to the M's; at one time I think they had as many as four of them; I remember two plus a later Twin City wheatland tractor as a young 'un. Grandfather bought the first Allis, a WD-45 as he got where was uncomfortable trying to handle the Farmalls but wanted to keep on working as much as could; it was smaller and easier to get on/off of. He passed in '57 and Dad took over the operation and it was then we did the aforementioned renovations to the barn, moved from the registered shorthorn milking breeding cowherd to a heifer stocker/feeder operation and built the new silo and the feedlot.
At that time had a Farmall 400 as well. '58 brought the first really good wheat crop in quite a long time and was the impetus for finally "going modern". Traded the 400 up to a 560 and the WD-45 for the D-17 (only kept it because had a full line of the snap-coupler toolbar attachments that had very little resale value; there were only a couple other Allis users in the whole county. Bought a new Case 930 wheatland for the flat ground work. Unfortunately, the 560 was a dud but shortly after Deere introduced the first of the inline six 4000 series, and the rest is, as they say, history--neither dad nor grandpa would ever have the Johnny-poppers' they did not want to have to listen to them all day every day. The first 4010 was such a step forward in comparison to everything else was on the market at the time it was within two or three years we had it, another 4020, then a 5000 series wheatland to replace the Case. From there went to the 4200 series, and then 4440, 4640, and progressed to the FWA and finally the full 4WD of today...
The Allis was converted to the loader tractor (a _very_ nice little loader albeit short reach) w/ the wide stance and low cockpit and relegated to utility use around the place with a little Fordson mower and the like. (I keep my eyes out for a nice clean D17, too, just for nostalgia). I've a small JD 955 utility w/ bucket and mower deck that fits the bill for most small stuff, but on occasion it would still be nice for something between it and the 4440 that kept for the hay fork and bucket and use with the batwing mower, etc.
All the rowcrop work went to the Deeres as we moved from the 4-row to 6, 8, 12 and eventually 24 w/ GPS and air seeders, ... Dad sold the Allis and all the attachments at auction; by then there were some small "city-farmers" beginning to have some small tracts for hobby farming.
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late sixties. Both were wide front - the 540 had a trip loader on it - a USELESS loader tractor even with a barrel of solid concrete on the 3 point. No power steering and almost impossible to turn with the bucket over half full. Useless on a plough too. About the only thing it was good for was the mower, hay conditioner (crimper) or baler - and hauling wagons. The old massey would pull like a mule, and in "road gear" would really move wagons (it would do about 33MPH) The 540 was replaced with a David Brown after I left the farm.
My brother has a D17 and an old IH B414 at his plase up at Parry Sound / Huntsville. The D17 is a decent tractor and the 414 is a hunk of junk - even worse than it was when new. It does have an industrial loader - the only reason he keeps it around.
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On 11/5/2015 4:21 PM, dpb wrote:

Thanks, helps others out here find similar problems.
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Put a couple of 100 watt light bulbs on each side of the 240V lines to neut ral. Measure the voltages, they should each be about 1/2 of the 240 line t o line voltage. Then turn off one of the four bulbs, so that you still have a load on each side, but one is twice the load of the other. Measure the voltages again. The voltage across the single bulb should be well over 120V , and the voltage across the two paralleled bulbs should be well under 120V . Do this quickly as the single bulb may burn out very quickly due to the over-voltage.
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