Barbecue Grill burner replacements

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I have a stainless steel grill that we bought from Sam's Club.
http://igor.chudov.com/misc/ebay/tmp/tmp-6648.jpg
After 8 years, the iron burners on it rotted considerably. As I look for replacements, I see "cast iron burners" available at many websites. Example is here:
http://www.gasngrills.com/members-mark-cast-iron-burner-29251.html
I was hoping to find stainless burners so that the new ones would not rust. Realistically speaking, is that "cast iron" any more rust resistant than the original material, or are they also going to rot?
i
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The burners and grills are considered "consumables" and are expected to be replaced as needed.
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The stainless steel burners on my Vermont Castings are as good as new after 12 years. So are the porcelain coated cast iron grates. You need to buy a better grill if you think they are consumables.
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Why wouldn't anyone want to sell stainless burners for my grill? These burners seem to fit a lot of grills, and therefore there is enough market to make stainless burners. I would pay the premium.
i
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On Mar 27, 10:55 pm, Ignoramus11443 <ignoramus11...@NOSPAM. 11443.invalid> wrote:

Because you got 8 years out of much cheaper iron ones in an inexpensive grill from Sams club. That 8 years probably exceeds the life expectation of the whole unit for a low to mid-range priced grill.
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On Sun, 28 Mar 2010 06:23:59 -0700 (PDT), snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net wrote:

I bet that grill was $700-800, far from low priced.
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On Mar 28, 10:25 am, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

I'll bet it's inexpensive if you compare it to the same size grill from Weber, Jennaire or Viking, I see run of the mill grills made in China at Costco. They are OK for the price as long as you realize what you are getting. I bought a Charmglow or Charbroil can't remember which at Lowes. It's half the price of a Weber, but then I also realized what I'm getting and don't expect it to last as long. I can also tell you that the heat distribution is far superior on the Weber. in the sense that it is uniform. For what I use it for and using some common sense, it works fine. But I won't be looking for longlife replacement parts for it.
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Ignoramus11443 wrote:

The problem is that many of the burners are not compatible. Different orifice sizes different regulators and air feeds make it hard to make a "universal" burner. However you could easily retrofit a better cast iron burner out of a different make into yours. You may have to change the orifices to compensate for the burner holes though.
As for the grids, Most stove/furnace places that sell wood/coal fired equipment can get you cast iron grates that will outlast stainless steel easily. Stainless doesn't do well in the presence of heat unless it is expensive alloy types.
Take a look at the high end grills and you find cast iron burners and grates. Some have cast iron burners with brass jets for even better heat control.
--
Steve W.

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On 3/27/2010 9:10 PM, RAM³ wrote:

where they went to the ChiComs and said make us 100,000 grills as cheaply as possible or you go for better quality. I bought a quality grill and it is ~ 17 years old and it still is in really good condition.
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So, tell us
1) What grill did you buy 2) How much did you pay 3) What was the material for burners and grates 4) What did you have to replace in the grill 5) How much do you use your grill
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I worry about 'burning' chrome and nickel into the flame and thus into the food.
Carbon iron - as it would be are common elements to the body so if you get some extra carbon or iron you get richer blood or cast it off.
Martin
Ignoramus11443 wrote:

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I'm trying to figure out why anybody would go to all this trouble for a gas grill... The grill in my new outdoor kitchen is charcoal, as God intended.
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On Sat, 27 Mar 2010 21:32:21 -0600, Joe Pfeiffer

This is true. In Heaven they use charcoal. They considered using propane, but had a hard time running the supply hose that high.
You can tell when they are grilling because the rain is grey.
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AMEN!
--
Jim Yanik
jyanik
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wrote:

Charcoal is great if cooking out is an event but there are a lot of people like me who use the gas grill almost every day. I am just not willing to screw with it although I do throw a few briquettes in the grill some times, just for the smoke. I also use a lot of hickory chips.
I have a Sams SS grill too and I have had to replace a couple of the burners along with the grates and the "flavor blocks" or whatever you call those ceramic plates. The good news is they are on the Sams web site
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re: "I'm trying to figure out why anybody would go to all this trouble for a gas grill"
Because 12 minutes after I started the grill this morning I had a nice medium steak alongside 2 over-easy eggs and some whole grain toast - cooked on the grill and side burner.
Because 10 minutes after I decide to have a burger or sausage, I'm eating said burger or sausage.
Because I need the whole grill and a little more temperature control when cooking pizza on the grill.
Because I use my grill at least one a week, even in mid-winter, for "single servings".
Because grilled pineapple is a great - and quick - appetizer even when the rest of the meal is being cooked in the kitchen.
I could go on, and I'm not trying to convince you that gas is better than charcoal, I'm just trying to help you "figure out why anybody would go to all this trouble for a gas grill".
My Weber kettle is under the deck and comes out quite often, but for ease of use and quick-turnaround, a gas grill sure is convenient. That's why we "go to the trouble."
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"DerbyDad03" wrote in message

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wrote:

The general concept shown here is correct, except that with practice you can get a golden brown crust, not the charred wreck they ended up with.
The "trick" is to brown one side the crust, which will stiffen it up, then flip it over, put your toppings on the browned side and then brown the other side while the toppings cook.
http://allrecipes.com/HowTo/Grilling-Pizza-Video/Detail.aspx
I always brush my dough with olive oil before grilling and I remove my crust while adding the toppings. That way the toppings have more time to cook while the crust browning.
Google around for topping suggestions. The possibilities are endless. You can't get pretty exotic.
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Ummm... I've had pizza cooked in a backyard wood-fired pizza oven; we did it by tossing the dough, putting toppings on while it was on a pizza peel, and then the pizza was slid into the oven (and later, of course, slid out).
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Joe Pfeiffer wrote:

There is a local Italian restaurant + pizza place that cooks everything over wood fires. When the wind is blowing the wrong way, you can smell it for miles. :(
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Lead free solder is Belgium's version of 'Hold my beer and watch this!'

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