Bar oil for electric chain saw.

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I have an electric McCulloch pole chain saw being delivered tomorrow. I have bar oil for a gas chain saw. Can it be used in an electric chain saw or is there a different (viscosity) bar oil for electrics?
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Bill
In Hamptonburgh, NY
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On 3/3/2010 12:15 AM, willshak wrote:

It should work fine, that's what I use in my electric chain saw without any problems.
Don
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== The bar oil for the gas chain saw will be fine. ==
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wrote:

The chain and bar does the exact same thing regardless of the type of motor driving it, so your answer is YES. I have an electric chain saw and I use the standard chain oil. I have never seen any special kind sold for electric models. Of course the manual will probably tell you to only use the McCulloch brand oil, but we all know they want you to buy their brand..... It's pretty much all the same.
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wrote:

The manual that came with mine said to use 30weight motor oil.
That said- I use what I have & just make sure it is oiling the bar.
Jim
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wrote:

I've used regular motor oil many times when that is all I had on hand. Even the multi-viscosity type such as 10W40. As long as the chain is getting some sort of lubricant, it should work properly and not wear. I was told the advantage to the "bar oil" is that it has an addative to make it stick better to the chain and the bar. Whether this is true, I am not sure. You know how everyone makes products just to make more money, and bar oil is pretty much just oil, which sells for 2 or more times the cost of motor oil. But it's not going to make me bankrupt, so I buy the stuff. I really do not know if it's any better than plain motor oil. I do think it's a little thicker than 30W oil. I have always wondered why it's colored????
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Not sure about the oil coloration, maybe to differentiate it because it is so thick, and may have additives that would cause failure if run in a regular crankcase. The State of Utah has two tax rates on their diesel fuel. The one for farm use is taxed a lot less, and is dyed. But if you get caught running it in a vehicle with a license plate on it, I understand it is a big fine.
Steve, a Utard
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I've also heard that bar oil is more sticky. I find that to be the case.
Colored? Affirmative Action. That kind of oil wasn't allowed in bars for many years, especially in the deep south.
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Christopher A. Young
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oil to lube the chain & bar. Regular bar & chain oil is too thick to feed the chain properly unless you pump continuously (until your thumb cramps up or falls off). The lighter weight oil (30W) may leak a bit, but your chain & bar will last a lot longer.
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Unless the manual says differently, regular bar and chain oil is fine.
Do note that most of the electric ones do not have an auto oilier so you need to pump it a couple of strokes each time and the tightness of the oil cap affects the flow.
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Colbyt
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-snip-

I've got 2- one on a pole- both cheapies-- and both have (lousy) auto-oilers. Both get stored in buckets as whatever oil is left in them after a job runs out.
But for $30-40 I still like the little toys.
Jim
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For any kind of chain saw. What you have will work just fine.
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wrote:

If that is the case, then you can just use a thicker weight auto engine oil. It's a damn sight cheaper.
Steve
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Any lighter weight oil will do. I often use the cheap transmission oil as another poster also said. In the winter it doesn't get as thick. But I'll put just about anything in, left over power steering or brake fluid, motor cycle fork oil, etc.
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wrote:

Any lighter weight oil will do. I often use the cheap transmission oil as another poster also said. In the winter it doesn't get as thick. But I'll put just about anything in, left over power steering or brake fluid, motor cycle fork oil, etc.
reply: Thank you. I learned something. That makes my day, learning something every day. There have been times when I was out of bar oil and didn't run my saw. Now, I'll use bar oil when I have it, and use other things, which I have several gallons of, when I don't have bar oil. BTW, I bought a gallon of bar oil whilst at the local farm supply house on sale, still high in price with relations to other lubricating fluids.
Steve
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Steve, the multi-visicoty oils work but do sling a little. 30W non-detergent works fine. Most what I personally use.
Have a friend who lives on a farm. Never uses anything but old filtered motor oil from his cars, tractors or whatever. His heavily used 25 year old saw seemed to be going strong the last time I saw it.
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As I was watching mine, I figured so long as it doesn't go dry, that it wouldn't matter. And yes, the thinner, the more sling. I just wasn't sure.
Steve
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Yes, but it's not the same stuff. Bar and chain oil is stickier. You can use motor oil, but you use a lot more of it because it gets slung off the chain faster.
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Doug Miller wrote the following:

Motor oil is a lubricant albeit lighter than bar oil which pours like molasses, but like others have said they used, transmission fluid and brake fluid are hydraulic fluids and may have lubricant properties, but I would rather have a fluid designed for pure lubrication, and like you said, motor oil gets slung off the chain faster. I'll use the real bar oil.
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Bill
In Hamptonburgh, NY
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Me, too. But it is nice to know that I can use other lubricants in a pinch.
Steve
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