Bam! Garage door over-the-door torsion spring snapped! How to replace?

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On Sun, 04 Nov 2012 13:21:12 -0800, Oren wrote:

I'm sure he covered EVERYTHING in there!
I could use it if/when I plaster 'my' pool - but for now, I'll stick with the garage door spring.
BTW, it's funny that the count for 10, 20, 30 coils was consistent, but then, on 40 coils, the count went bad.
I'm not sure why - maybe the angle of spring twist is taking effect?

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On Sun, 04 Nov 2012 17:25:52 -0800, Oren wrote:

I think it might be due to the angle of the spring, when, all of a sudden, it moved over by one.
That's probably why they specify 10 turns or 20 but not more than that.
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Danny D. wrote:

I won't be telling you how to do it, but to source the spring:
Call Larry @ Windsor Door
(281) 820-5284
7801 N Shepherd Dr Ste 104, Houston, TX 77088
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On Sun, 04 Nov 2012 01:14:17 +0000, Danny D. wrote:

OK. Thanks to you guys, I've done the preliminary research. Now it's time to order a replacement (higher cycle) spring and to make observations to help the next garage owner who reads this in the future.
Since this is a replacement spring, the weight of the garage door is not a critical factor (assuming the old spring worked).
The four replacement spring values of import are: 1.Wire gauge <== not measured directly! 2.Chirality 3.Unsprung length <== measured in two parts 4.ID of the coils <== not measured directly!
Interestingly, two of those measurements are not measured directly because they shrink and expand over time.
See details as to what is "NOT" measured directly in this video:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=6hBJB4JheBc#t
2s
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For others to benefit, you don't have to measure the ID of the torsion spring because it's already accurately marked on each end.
See this right-hand red cone showing DNS 200 (i.e., 2 inch ID): LARGE:
SMALL:

And, here's the other side, showing the same designation (DNS 200): LARGE:
SMALL:

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For others to benefit, you don't have to measure the ID of the torsion spring because it's already accurately marked on each end.
See this right-hand red cone showing DNS 200 (i.e., 2 inch ID): LARGE:
SMALL:

And, here's the other side, showing the same designation (DNS 200): LARGE:
SMALL:

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On Tue, 06 Nov 2012 00:53:46 +0000, Danny D. wrote:

I forgot to mention, the color code red 'often' means right hand stationary cone as described in this excellent video of how to size a torsion spring:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=HUQ3yzd6uBc#t
`s
BTW, if you take your right hand and point your thumb outward along the line of the 1" hollow shaft. If the winds follow your right hand fingers, they are wound right (as mine is).
If they follow your left hand fingers, it's a left-hand wind.
Pretty simple!
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another option for the op
buy your own parts so you can get the better quality
hire a guy to install it and you watch him so you learn the real tricks
DIY the next time
there is NOTHING as good as watching someone who knows what they are doing...
Mark
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On Mon, 05 Nov 2012 17:41:02 -0800, Mark wrote:

I might actually do that! If they let me.
BTW, look at the critter I found hanging out above the 4-inch aluminum drum when I looked more closely at the wind-up drum just now to determine if it truly was four inches in diameter: LARGE:
SMALL:

Here's a closeup of the huge black widow spider next to the drum (after spraying it with RAID): LARGE:
SMALL:

And, here's what I was looking for at the time (APCO 400-S):
Note: The APCO 400-S (or is it 400-5?) on the drum apparently indicates a 4-inch drum. I'm not sure what the character after the dash indicates.
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Danny D. wrote:

It's your house. They can't not let you watch. Offer cold drinks or coffee, and don't get in their way. Offer light conversation like "how's business", then you'll likely get a much friendlier banter when you ask technical questions.
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Danny D. wrote:

BTW, do you live in the Houston area by chance?
I can do it for ya.
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On Mon, 05 Nov 2012 20:14:41 -0600, G. Morgan wrote:

Silicon Valley.
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Danny D. wrote:

Ah, too far of a commute for me. Unless you want to pay the trip charge!
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I think the hardest measurement is, surprisingly, the wire gauge.
I just measured the broken spring wire gauge with a rule: 10 coils = 2 5/16", so that's 2.3125/10 = 0.231" 20 coils = 4 11/16", so that's 4.6875/20 = 0.234" 30 coils = 7 1/16", so that's 7.0625/30 = 0.235"
Then, I measured with a micrometer in 3 different places: 0.241"(
) 0.242"(
) 0.237"(
)
Geez Louise. I know how to use a mic - but this wire has been stretched at the end that I can measure.
How do I better nail down the (real) wire gauge anyway?
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On Tue, 06 Nov 2012 02:50:55 +0000, Danny D. wrote:

Making things worse, this chart doesn't show ANY of those numbers! http://www.docstoc.com/docs/80621748/Items-needed-to-calculate-replacement-springs
That chart shows: 0.2343" when 10 coils = 2 5/16" & when 20 coils = 4 5/8" 0.2437" when 10 coils = 2 7/16" & when 20 coils = 4 7/8" 0.2500" when 10 coils = 2 1/2" & when 20 coils = 5"
I hate when I don't know the exact size. I need a better (more consistent) measurement method.
I'm guessing it's the 0.2343" gauge simply because that's the closest using the 10+20 coil method; but it's not even close to any one of my micrometer measurements. Sigh.
Any ideas?
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Danny D. wrote:

See here yet?
http://ddmgaragedoors.com/diy-instructions/how-to-measure-torsion-springs.php
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On Tue, 06 Nov 2012 00:44:10 -0600, G. Morgan wrote:

Interestingly, I've been on that site a lot as their DIYs are probably the best out there - and I'm likely to buy from them - as they're the most helpful - but - I had not been to that particular page.
They do start out contradicting themselves somewhat though, in that they say in that page you only need these 5 things: (1) length, (2) wire size, (3) inside diameter, (4) spring wind, and (5) type of ends
For a proper DIY, you REALLY need to know (at least) a dozen things: (1) length (mine appears to be 26.5") (2) wire size (mine appears to be 0.2343") (3) inside diameter (mine is 2" ID) (4) spring wind (mine is wound right) (5) type of ends (mine are standard) (6) door height (mine is 7' tall) (7) drum diameter (mine is 4.00 inches wide) (8) track radius (mine appears to be 13" which is a strange number) (9) bearing to drum distance (I can handle a 60"-18"B" spring length) (10) door weight (I don't know my door weight yet) (11) twists (mine apparently was twisted 9 times) (12) cycles (I'm aiming for 20,000 or 30,000 cycles)
I'm going to call the DDM tech support folks tomorrow to figure out what to do about my strange track radius of 13 inches. Tech Support: 877-436-9446 · Orders: 800-383-9548 / 630-293-1312
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Danny D. wrote:

Best of luck to you, BE SAFE !!!
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Here's a great Youtube video on changing out torsion springs:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zxUoJrLhaSI

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On Mon, 05 Nov 2012 20:28:11 -0600, SRN wrote:>

Yes. I've seen that. I referenced it prior. What I LOVE about that one is that it shows the spring breaking before our very eyes!
The thing I don't like about it is that it covers the two-spring doors, and mine is a single spring.
I hate extrapolating when safety is a factor - but it IS a wonderful video!
Thanks!
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