ball valve for washer supply lines

Like many others, I want to replace the gate valves on my washer supply lines with proper ball valves. I'm comfortable with sweating copper pipes where I have good access, which I do not have in this case. So what I'd like to do if possible is put a ball valve directly on the outlet of each existing gate valve, and then attach my supply hoses to the ball valve outlets respectively - all using threaded components.
I realize this will involve a variety of adapters and fittings, if it's even possible at all. Can someone privy to plumbing terminology help me come up with a bill of materials to hand to the local parts counter? Or are there compelling reasons not to do it this way?
Thanks! dakota2112
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I meant to add that I think this can be easily done using simple garden hose type ball valves, but for some reason those wouldn't seem suitable for this application (it would be too easy, so there'd have to be a catch)
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If the gate valve are the "threaded" variety why not just turn off the water supply, unscrew the gate valves & install threaded ball valve.
Or are the current gate valves sweated in place?
If clearance & orientation needs to be modified you can use close nipples or street elbows.
Those garden hose ball valves are not the correct solution, in fact they could be a source of failure themselves.
If you're worried about a potential burst hose, I'd do a proper ball valve installation or consider "auto shutoff" supply lines
cheers Bob
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There's also compression mount ball valves.
s

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The purpose for ball valves is to allow full, unrestricted water flow. If you put one inline with an angle or globe valve, you've still got the restriction of the other valve. What do you accomplish? Not much.
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On May 1, 10:38am, "Stormin Mormon"

re: What do you accomplish? Not much.
A ball valve would accomplish what the OP wants to accomplish:
The ability to shut off the water after each use without messing with the current gate valves, for fear of them leaking due to not being used for many years.
I don't think that restricted flow is anything that the OP is concerned with.
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Correct. I'm not worried about reduced flow.
How do these recessed "washer boxes" get installed? That's what I've got, it's a WaterTite brand. I gained visual access in the basement to see what's down there. It's two 1/2" copper (hot and cold) going straight up through the floor and into the wall beneath the box. The existing valves sit flush on the bottom of the plastic box, they have a flange at the base of the valve with flats for a wrench. The drain goes down in the middle. The pipes are rigid in the vertical direction (they don't move vertically at all). I see what appears to be a piece of flattened copper pipe shoved up next to each pipe where it enters the floor, not sure what that's for. The valves do seem free in a torsional manner, ie I can force the valves to rotate slightly about the axis of the vertical pipe meaning I'm twisting the pipes themselves. The thing that really confuses me though is that the relatively large PVC drain pipe enters the box inbetween the valves, and exits through the floor co-planar with the pipes but NOT inbetween them. Somehow inside the wall, the drain pipe is routed past one of the copper pipes. I would hope the copper doesn't do a dogleg in all that, because that might complicate doing anything with this.
I'm not sure how I would even go about removing the existing valves. If they are threaded on, I won't be able to remove them because the pipe flexes torsionally and I can't access the pipe itself to prevent that. I'm open to suggestions on how to do a proper remove and replace. But I don't want this to turn into a major project, hence my desire to just thread ball valves inline before the rubber hoses ;-)
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re: But I don't want this to turn into a major project
You may not have a choice. I see 2 possible routes to follow:
You can rig something together by putting mupltiple valves in line with each other or...
When mentioning the original gate valves, you said: "they are often seized open, or the packing nut starts leaking once you turn them, etc). "
It's time to man-up and try the valves. If they're siezed up you'll know right away. Packing nuts are a piece of cake to replace - probably easier than all the trouble your going to go through to add new valves in line. If the valves work, you're problem is solved, if not, it's time to replace them, regardless of how much work it will take.
Even if they do work, but you really want ball valves for ease of operation, it's time grab the tools, open the wall and do the job properly. Install one of those single handle washer shutoffs like you would for a new install.
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Did you ask?
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What do you want to accomplish?
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On May 3, 10:22pm, "Stormin Mormon"

It's been stated several times already, but:
"The existing gate valves may or may not work for their intended purpose... I never turn them off because of the stigma associated with them (they are often seized open, or the packing nut starts leaking once you turn them, etc). But to avoid un-needed problems with burst hoses, I want to be able to shut the supply off except when in use."
No matter though, because I already found what I needed at the local hardware store: 3/4" female hose thread to 1/2" male thread, ball valve w/ 1/2" female threads, 1/2" male thread to 3/4" male hose thread)
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Is the P-trap for the washer drain visible in the basement? If not, it is in the wall, which explains why the pipe jogs.

I believe they are threaded on, but someone else with more experience should confirm that. If so, you would need to open up the wall below the box so that you can get an opposing wrench on the connection.
Cheers, Wayne
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duh, absolutely - the drain trap is inside the wall! That explains the offset. Thanks for pointing out the obvious which I totally overlooked :)
I think the valves must be threaded on, as there's no way a torch could've gotten in there without melting the plastic, and it doesn't look like there's clearance to insert the vertical pipe with a valve already soldered on the end. Opening up the wall to get in there and hold the pipes is what I had planned if all else fails. I'm just not looking forward to doing a voluntary drywall repair - but this whole thing is to avoid a catastrophic leak in the first place, so...
As for the existing valves, they are not seized completely, but they were a bear to turn the last time I shut them off which was several years ago. That's why I'd rather piggyback or replace completely.
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