Ball park cost for breaker box replacement

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"Eigenvector" wrote

In my area, there's not an electrician that would touch a project with the H/O supplying the material.
A permit cost is $150, heck to pull a meter and remount (for siding), the permit is $75. In this area, I've heard to replace the service, the cost runs 900-1,200.
You would be doing yourself a favor and not mention you want to supply materials. As a former contractor, I wouldn't waste valuable time trying to chase down a penny pinching lead.
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Well I never said anything about penny pinching, I am fully prepared to pay 2500 bucks for the work, and I was going to get (that is I haven't actually bought) a Cutler-Hammer box based on the positive reviews it got from a couple of my friends.
I do see what you mean about guarenteeing someone else's equipment, but they have to buy the box anyway so I might as well get one that I prefer as opposed to them bringing an el-cheapo model. Can I ask them/request them to use a particular model or quality?
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"Eigenvector" wrote in message

I meant, in your original post, you stated you wanted to supply material. If you're telling electricians this, you come off as a penny pincher. You don't have to say "I'm a penny pincher". I fully understand you may want to use certain brands, you should state that, without mentioning you want to supply them.

Contractors love to be asked questions. If they don't agree with you, they will let it be known, and why. Most every contractor with an ounce of dignity, wants to use quality materials on R&R work.
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Eigenvector wrote:

Yes it is perfectly acceptable to specify particular equipment. That is a normal practice in the building trades.
--
Tom Horne

"This alternating current stuff is just a fad. It is much too dangerous
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I paid just over $200 (I think it was $220) for a new service, breaker box, breakers, 3 way switch added to a basement light, and a new outside light and switch, an additional receptacle right on the panel. .
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I just had some work done by an electrician friend of mine at my cabin. He put in eight exterior four plug receptacles, four switches with runs to exterior lights, mounted the conduit and boxes for two motion halogen lights, and put a light and switch in the under the stairs closet.
I had to buy the Romex. He brought all the conduit and boxes and weatherproof covers and various stuff from his work for all the rest. I had to buy the two $50 halogen motion lights. I had to buy him two cases of beer, and let him stay in the cabin for three days.
Do you think I got taken?
Oh, I also bought him a Remington 870 synthetic stock 12 ga. shotgun.
Steve
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wrote

.
You did good. The $220 job was 1966. Do you think prices have gone up since then?
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wrote

I think I did good. We're friends, and although he gives me a break, I try to take care of him.
Steve
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I've been doing repair and install work for several years. Both for my own company, and working for someone else. It's OK to say you prefer some brand or other of parts, but it's not OK to supply your own parts.
People who supply their own parts tend to be:
1) overcontrolling. This is the guy who will watch every thing you do, ask too many questions, and tell you how to do your work. This is a total PIA that contractors hate.
2) Buying the wrong parts. Most of the time, customers by the cheapest parts they can find, which end up not fitting, or need a lot of extra time to make them work. It's hard to get them to understand that the cheap part is far more labor than the good part that I woulda installed.
3) Trying to keep the price down, by cutting out the contractor's normal and expected markup on the parts. This is the guy who buys the cheap part on Ebay, or at the local home center, and expects the contractor to enjoy installing cheap junk for discounted labor rates.
My suggestion is to skip the "if I supply the parts" and just call em out for estimates.
--

Christopher A. Young
You can\'t shout down a troll.
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Eigenvector wrote:

I had this done on 1/2 of a duplex about five years ago. 200A service, $800.
Recently, the other half of the duplex needed the same treatment. The same company was now charging $1100.
I bought the panel/breakers/etc at HD and did the work myself, with my son helping. We started at 10:00am and were finished around 5:00. Out-of-pocket cost: ~$280.00. Then we had a beer.
In my jurisdiction (Houston) no permit is required nor is there a fee for removing/resetting the meter. (Houston also has no zoning laws - eat your heart out.)
So flush with the thrill of a job well done, we repeated the process a couple of weeks later at his house.
I wrote up the project for this newsgroup. Check the archives.
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On Fri, 15 Sep 2006 16:47:09 -0700, "Eigenvector"

Are you hiring them as employees? Do you plan on covering their workmen's comp, and employer side SSI contribution? These are retorical questions, I'm trying to explain you are paying for a job, not for new employees so do your job as a consumer and get specs and estimates.
Now for the price, I have to say that is 'ball park' for a differcult job. Depending on permit requirements, inspections, licensing requirements, materials and the distance from weather head to the panel, $2500 could be very fair.
So get three estimates, proof of insurance (GL and if there are employees, workman's comp), follow up with insurance phone call to see if policy is current, get detailed specs, and get some patience. You are getting something installed that if done right, should outlast your home. :)
Now back to your post, what is a 'failing circuit breaker box'?
Disclaimer: Not your electrician, most likely not licensed in your area, so this isn't a how-to, but a friendly suggestion on how as a home owner I would proceed.
later,
tom
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Eigenvector wrote:

200 Amp panel, $600 cdn ... with breakers.
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Eigenvector wrote:

It is obvious from the tone of your inquiry that you believe you are entitled to have an electrical contractor do the job at his/her labor cost alone. That means he/she is supposed to absorb all of the overhead cost of supplying the labor to do your job. Any business that accedes to such demands will fail. Are you aware that people invest in a business in the expectation that they will make a profit?
No qualified person is going to want to work with parts he/she did not obtain themselves.
If the difference between the price "to the trade" and the retail price is part of the contractors margin and you get them to forgo it he/she has to make it up somewhere else. If it is not part of that particular firms margin you will be raising the cost of your job.
Far more importantly neither I or any other electrician I've ever heard of will be willing to warranty parts for which I/we do not hold the purchase receipt. I would not be willing to warranty parts that may have come from a salvage dealer or a retailer that is going out of business even if the parts are in sealed boxes. I know the supply houses I deal with will take back defective parts no questions asked. I know they will not sell me used parts the installation of which is a code violation in some jurisdictions.
That having been said the cost of a service equipment upgrade for a single family residence varies from $1000 in rural West Virginia up to $3000 for an underground service in Washington, DC. Quit trying to pick apart the contractors price and get three estimates. Check the histories and references of the contractors and select the bid in which you then have the most confidence.
--
Tom Horne

"This alternating current stuff is just a fad. It is much too dangerous
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> It is obvious from the tone of your inquiry that you believe you are

Yeah, there's a lot of overhead -- taxes, FICA, Social Security, Workman's Comp, medical/retirement benefits for employees, truck or van cost (plus gas), tools, materials (including the fuse box itself), training, advertising, permits, might be a small office staff to pay (receptionist/bookkeeper), etc..
-
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Tom Horne, Electrician wrote:

Two years ago I had a Chevrolet dealership repair the AC in my pickup. *I* provided the parts, THEY provided the labor. I saved about $400 on the price of the compressor alone.
Of course at an auto dealership, the service department profit bucket is not connected to the parts department profit bucket. Evidently, there is only one bucket at an electrical contractor - but that is not true of all businesses.
And, oh, yeah. Two hot seasons on, everything continues to work swell.

Not always. See above.
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HeyBub wrote:

Qualified person is a "term of art" in the regulated building trades. It means a person that is actually qualified to perform the work in accordance with the applicable codes and standards. An automotive mechanics work is not state or local government regulated for quality of work in most places.
--
Tom Horne

Well we aren\'t no thin blue heroes and yet we aren\'t no blackguards to.
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And, if you work at Jiffy Lube, the term "mechanic" means absolutely nothing.
Steve
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$600 or so is in the ballpark. $2500 must come with a new TV or the like. MLD

circuit
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I had a new metal roof put on my cabin this summer. It was $5500. The only other guy that showed up wanted $10,500. I figured he didn't need or want the work, and bid it so that if he had to do it, he would make out like a bandit.
Steve
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Eigenvector wrote:

Keep checking around and save yourself over a $1,000.

I guess they don't want/need the business. What's the big secret?

Anything more than a thousand and you've been fucked.
It ain't brain surgery.
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