Bacteria sick shower head!

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Every week or so there is something 'in the news' that's unhealthy or causes a risk to one's well-being! These items sometimes even get 15 seconds of coverage on some TV news spot! Musta been a slow news night?
These 'studies' or findings are often presaged by such wording as 'A recent study of 56,000 suburban families finds that ....... yada, yada, .... "!
This week; it's bacteria contaminated shower heads!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
Also with news "That some of these bacteria can 'resist' the administration of household bleach!". Oh what a calamity! Cos I occasionally bleach counter-tops and other areas and put wooden cutting boards etc. into the dishwasher at high temps, immediately after use!
But; not being paranoid or anything I unscrewed our shower head a few minutes ago to NOT find any goopy green or black gelatinous mess of creepy crawly bacteria (finding only one or two minute black stones at the inlet). Perched it on the spout of the water kettle and boiled steam (212 deg F) through it for two minutes (hoping the shower insides haven't melted!).
Incidentally we are currently under a municipal 'Boil water' advisory because a pipe broke at the local pumping and chlorination site. (Oh; btw there's another substance, chlorine, that apparently was/is the cause of asthma in many children ............... maybe that will be next week's concern?
So reckon we are safe; eh? Now I have to clean the kettle!
Cheers
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My same reation! What next "study shows that air contains bacteria and breathing it can make you sick"?
Harry K
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On Wed, 16 Sep 2009 07:18:51 -0700 (PDT), terry

Hot water in your dishwasher helps thin grease to aid in cleaning but does nothing to kill bacteria. Complete immersion in boiling water for a minimum of 20 minutes is needed to sanitize anything.
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On Wed, 16 Sep 2009 10:37:31 -0400, snipped-for-privacy@dog.com wrote:
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There's a long way between "does nothing" and sanitize [assuming you meant 'sterilize' - as I sanitize my hands with soap & 100degree water]. There is an NSF standard that says 160 degrees for 10 minutes kills most bacteria.
Surgical tools might need a little more temp or time.
Jim
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wrote:

212 degrees for 20 minutes. You can call whatever you do, whatever you prefer. It doesn't kill all the bacteria. It's usually the tougher bacteria you need to kill. Wiping your cutting board with a dry paper towel kills/removes some bacteria, too.
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snipped-for-privacy@dog.com wrote:

You can't just lump all bacteria together. There are too many different kinds with different tolerances.
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On Wed, 16 Sep 2009 17:25:54 -0400, Van Chocstraw

That's why you need 212 degrees for a minimum of 20 minutes. You won't find any bacteria in a shower head that will survive that. Lower temps for shorter periods won't kill all of them.
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On Sep 16, 5:34�pm, snipped-for-privacy@dog.com wrote:

It is sooooo hard for me to believe that in the 61 years of my life, I haven't died sooner from all this bacteria, viruses, and other unknown diseases. And to think I have never santitized/sterilized my shower head. I must be the luckiest guy in the world!
Hank <~~~ Drinks tap water
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On Wed, 16 Sep 2009 15:08:30 -0700 (PDT), "Hustlin' Hank"

It certainly hasn't raised your IQ any.
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Hustlin' Hank wrote:

What most lay persons do not appreciate is that the greatest statistical risk from what comes out of their tap is chemical, not biological contamination. All the sterilization in the world will do nothing to keep PERC and countless other carcinogenic and/or mutagenic chemicals off their skin and out of their system.
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On Wed, 16 Sep 2009 17:34:37 -0400, in alt.home.repair, snipped-for-privacy@dog.com wrote:

Do you live right on the seacoast? At my inland altitude, water boils at a scant 204 degrees.
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On Wed, 16 Sep 2009 23:39:11 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@asgard.slcc.edu

Maybe it's 212 up saltydog's ass where he pulls out these funfacts.
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On Wed, 16 Sep 2009 19:44:41 -0500, AZ Nomad

If it's too hot for you, get out.
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On Wed, 16 Sep 2009 23:39:11 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@asgard.slcc.edu wrote:

You can still heat it to 212 degrees, dopey.
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On Sep 16, 5:59pm, snipped-for-privacy@dog.com wrote:

Only in a sealed container dopey. You can't do it in an open pan.
Harry K
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On Wed, 16 Sep 2009 21:33:48 -0700 (PDT), harry k

You are wrong. Water can be heated past the boiling point.
You could also, of course, heat oil to 500 degrees. That would kill bacteria, too.
For that matter, if you think you can do it only using water by using a pressure cooker, you still have a way of heating water to 212 degrees, don't you?
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On Sep 17, 3:34am, snipped-for-privacy@dog.com wrote:

My point (add it to the one on your head) is that you CANNOT, no matter how you try heat water to 212 degrees in an open pan except at sealevel...even then perhaps not depending on the barometer reading.
I would explain why to you but it would not sink in.
Harry K
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On Thu, 17 Sep 2009 12:19:11 -0700 (PDT), harry k

You are wrong.
Water temps can be made to rise further after boiling starts.
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On Thu, 17 Sep 2009 15:22:41 -0400, in alt.home.repair, snipped-for-privacy@dog.com wrote:

Do explain.
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On Sep 17, 4:32pm, snipped-for-privacy@asgard.slcc.edu wrote:

Yes, I am waiting for it. I wonder if that is possible usign some esoteric laboratory equipment/heat source. I picture some massive amount of heat applied such that even boiling can't carry off the excess heat.
Harry K
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