Backup for Well Water During Power Outages

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Perhaps. I would rather just fill up some containers BEFORE we have a power outage. I can use our normal water supply as needed. When it runs out and I need to start using the water in the containers, I know my supply is limited and may need to go refill them.
Anthony Watson www.mountainsoftware.com www.watsondiy.com
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Interesting. I'll take your word on that. I've never tried filling a tank like that to know for sure.
I learned something new today.
Anthony Watson www.mountainsoftware.com www.watsondiy.com
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My wife & I lived on our sailboat for ten years. The 100 gallon water tank I built in it filled from the top, exited from the bottom. That worked because I put in a check valve in a pipe "U" on the top...when the water was pumped out, the exterior air pressure opened the valve to let air in.
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On Sun, 30 Nov 2014 17:55:55 -0500, Stormin Mormon

in the attic, vented to atmosphere, fill controlled by a float valve - gravity feed to to the faucets - including the "geyser".
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Someone is wrong on the internet. It is your duty to continue your efforts. You must.
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Per Stormin Mormon:

Mine made it to 84, but that is deceiving.
His life really mostly ended 20 years earlier from smoking-related disabilities.
I think the emphasis on death by anti-smoking efforts is a mistake. People are prone to say "Well, if I die, I die and that's the end of it." Instead of death, I'd emphasis the years of invalidism leading up to it.
For younger people, who generally think they're superhuman and immortal, I'd emphasize the bad breath and body odor.
--
Pete Cresswell

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Per philo :

Here's a quote from "Licit & Illicit Drugs" by Edward M. Becher and the Editors of Consumer Reports.
Page 217: (describing the outcome of a NYC Syananon's members to give up cigarettes for economic reasons)...
"...About 100 people left during the six-month period following the ban and chose possible readdiction to drugs outside Synanon to life without cigarettes," the Times added.
'With most drugs,' one Syananon resident explained, 'you get over the symptoms in a few days, a week at most. But with tobacco, we've notice them for at least six months.' Another, who had personally 'kicked' both heroin and tobacco, made a comparison of the two even more startling than Dr Dole's: 'It was much easier to quit heroin than cigarettes.'"
--
Pete Cresswell

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On 11/30/2014 05:39 PM, (PeteCresswell) wrote:

Thanks for that, it is so sad watching my friends literally killing themselves and they seem completely incapable of quitting.
When my wife and I go shopping, on the way out of the store we look at the cartons of cigarettes...typically $75 . Our groceries for the week generally come out to less than two cartons worth.
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For what it's worth, I did mention a second pressure tank in my original post.
The general idea was to connect two pressure tanks in parallel. When both tanks were full, shut off a valve to the second tank so it can't drain. If the power goes out and the first tank is empty, open the valve and you would have a second full tank of pressurized water.
Of course, the major drawback to this idea is that the water in the second tank would be stagnant. Not smart for long term storage.
The only way this would really work is if you had some kind of automated valve system that could alternate between the two tanks. When one tank is draining, the other could be refilling. When the first tank is drained, swap tanks and repeat.
As far as I know, no such valve exists?
For now, I'm planning to pick up a couple of five gallon water containers and store them in the pump house. I'll probably add a little bleach to each container just to sterilize the water, even though it's really only intended for flushing toilets. With 1.6 gallon toilets, that would give me five additional flushes once the main pressure tank runs out. That should be enough for the several hour time frame I've been trying to plan for.
Someday when I have more money than common sense, I might try the battery/charger/inverter option. :)
Anthony Watson www.mountainsoftware.com www.watsondiy.com
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On Tuesday, December 2, 2014 12:58:03 AM UTC-5, HerHusband wrote:

I don't see the advantage to shutting off the second pressurized tank and waiting until the first is empty. Leaving it on, you'd still draw water from both tanks, get the same amount of water, the pressure would just go down slower.

With no valve cutting it off from the system, as described above, it would not be stagnant, the water would constantly enter and leave it as the pressure in the system goes up and down. The pressure in both will go from pump cut-in pressure to cut-off pressure. That means water has to go in and out.

None required.

That's certainly the easiest solution for some extra water.
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On Tuesday, December 2, 2014 3:52:14 AM UTC-8, trader_4 wrote:

Yep. No matter how you hook up, or what kind of tanks, you run out of water at the same time.
Harry K
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On Tuesday, December 2, 2014 11:36:36 AM UTC-5, Harry K wrote:

You really are the village idiot. If you put a second regular tank in series with the existing pressure tank, you have an extra FULL TANK OF WATER when the power goes out. One more time, just like your water heater. Is that empty when the power goes out? If you add another 50 gal water heater, wouldn't you have 50 gals more water when the power went out? Same exact thing happens if he adds the extra tank, in series, as I outlined. I know, you admitted I was right. That you didn't understand what I meant. But here you are still spreading BS that makes no sense. If you add a 50 gallon tank, you have 50 gallons more water, just as if you had ten 5 gallon jugs sitting around.
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On 12/2/2014 12:57 AM, HerHusband wrote:

Of course, the camper and RV people have a lot of ways of supplying water. Perhaps you can get a fresh water tank designed for RV, with a 12 volt pump that feeds water into the house?
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Christopher A. Young
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With both tanks open, you could still have the situation where both tanks are empty when the power goes out. In that case, you would be in the same situation as a single tank.
Without a way to isolate the two tanks, it would only increase the capacity when they are full. It wouldn't help the close to empty situation.
Anthony Watson www.mountainsoftware.com www.watsondiy.com
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On Tuesday, December 2, 2014 10:27:33 AM UTC-5, HerHusband wrote:

Yes, I see your point. The tanks shouldn't be drawing down to totally empty, before the pump kicks on, but there probably isn't much water left when the pump kicks on. Whatever is left, with 2 tanks, you'd have 2x as much left, but I agree that isn't going to be much. You could also put less charge air in the second tank, in which case it would have more water at all times.
But, IDK why we're even talking about adding pressure tanks. They are inherently the wrong solution, because half or more of the tank volume is air, not water. If you just put a regular tank, ie no air, in series with the existing pressure tank, it would be full of water all the time. You could get the full tank of water out of it with a drain valve at the bottom. Or you could have a small tank of N2 and have pressurized water for the house.
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On Tue, 02 Dec 2014 07:56:55 -0500, Stormin Mormon

The only way to have a sizeable reserve of fresh water when the power goes out is to have a reservoir in series with the pump that is ALWAYS full, and continuously exchanged. A gravity storage tank fits the bill It needs to have an (filtered) atmospheric vent and a float/fill valve and feed your system by gravity, or an automatic vent that lets air in to drain it and lets air out to fill it, but does not let water out or contamination in. - and feeds your system either under pressure or by gravity when the power is on, and by gravity when it is off. I know several farms that used either a windmill or a hydraulic ram to pump well water or spring water into a "water tower" on the farm which provided gravity feed water to both the house and barns. They had freezing problems in the winter if the water was not kept running contiunously - and the ram pump in particular sometimes froze in the "spring-house". In realcold spells sometimes it was necessary to keep a lantern burning in the springhouse to prevent freezing and splitting the pump (the farm where my mother grew up- no hydro up untill the mid/late sixties)
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On Tuesday, December 2, 2014 5:05:46 PM UTC-5, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

Agree with that part, which is what I suggested in post #1.

In lieu of the above scheme, he could just use a simple storage tank in series at or below ground level together with a pump, like one of those suggested in the RV water supply idea. Boats also use similar. The boat ones are 12V pumps, intended to run off battery. Have one of those pumpts plumbed in, together with an inline tank, and you're good to go.
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