Backup, backup!

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Saturday July 27, 2013 Last week, one of my computer programs wasn't working right. Short form, is that I find out MS doesn't support XP anymore, and I can't get the computer working the way it used to. The way I liked. This new Thunderbird isn't very easy to use, at least compared to OE. I tried downloading a service pack from a non MS website, and got some kind of malware, that really made a mess of my drive, and my slave drive. Ended up buying a new drive, and I'm in the process of reformatting the drive I'd been using. Still can't get Outlook Express to work. Lost a lot of files, data, and thousands of old emails that were either not backed up, or can't be read with the new email program.
Just reminding y'all to make CD, DVD, and external drive backups of anything you consider valuable.
--
.
Christopher A. Young
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You can download lots of stuff from Microsoft for Windows XP. Not long ago I installed XP off a CD. I did need the COA number for the computer to regisiter it. About a month ago I donwloaded something for XP from their web page. Forgot what it was, but it was an update for an older XP part.
I was dilligent about making backups from the days I had a Radio Shack TRS3 computer and the 5 inch floppies.
Now all pix go on a dvd and an external hard drive that plugs into the usb port backs up the whole computer.
I also have two computers and they both have many of the same files. .
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Ralph Mowery wrote:

Hi, My small business accounting machine is still on Dell XP server. I am still getting automatic system update from now and then. Back up is automatically done, daily incremental and monthly whole back up onto my NAS drive with RAID set up. And then Once a year I back up important files again on external USB 3 drive which is stored at other place.
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,

When I was working I kept a copy of the important stuff such as pic, downloaded PDF that is hard to locate,and other things at work. Either on a cd,dvd or the thumb drive depending on the years past.
It is always a good idea to have off site storage if possiable. I would have it if I was in business. Probably in a safty deposit box and maybe one at home and one at the office..
One thing I would not do is to put any info on the web that I did not care who knew I had it. I think there are several places you can use for storage on the web either small ammouts for free, or pay for large ammounts.
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Ralph Mowery wrote:

Hi, Oh, No, I won't put out anything on web cloud storage. Once in my working days, a university campus mainframe system took a direct lightning hit wiping out all data to a point of uselessness. It had dozens of monster size mass storage subsystems occupying a large floor space. For an example operators used to move around on roller blades. Realizing the extent of system damage we decided to whole system image restore from a weekly backup kept at off site vault. It took 3 whole days(72 hours) non-stop rstore operations. The system was UPS battery bank with MG set up. LIghtning strike came down on main AC power buss.
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I don't trust cloud storage, as that means someone else can read the data. With a local external drive, it's not readable by others. As it happens, I did have two drives in my computer, at the point that I downloaded the malware (pretending to be XP service pack 3). I lost both drives. One was able to reformat, the other was not. Both drives, the data was all lost. Looking back, I ought have disconnected the F drive, and kept the data safe. Ought to have had all that data on a disconnected external drive before I went for the "upgrade". Some of the data had been burned to CD or DVD, and that's recoverable.
. Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus www.lds.org . .
On 7/28/2013 12:24 AM, Tony Hwang wrote:

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On Sun, 28 Jul 2013 08:06:50 -0400, Stormin Mormon

I don't get the fascination with cloud storage either. I do see the point that files are available at any time from any location, handy if you travel a lot. Problem is, the connections to the internet are not perfect and not always available. I'd hate to be sitting at either my home of office computer and not be able to work on a spreadsheet or revise a letter because the DSL line is out or a storm took out the cable.
For backup, it is probably OK, but so is burning a CD or using a thumb drive.
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On Sun, 28 Jul 2013 08:06:50 -0400, Stormin Mormon

You ought to have gotten your service pack from microsoft. http://support.microsoft.com/kb/322389
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On 7/27/2013 11:18 PM, Ralph Mowery wrote:

I had Carbonite when my machine went south last fall. I do not recommend it. Takes overnight first use and then slows down computer with constant interference. While it saved my business files, it did not save music or videos and most importantly did not save my Thunderbird profile and I lost all old retained emails and addresses. Now using a Seagate backup drive on new computer.
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On 7/27/2013 5:55 PM, Stormin Mormon wrote:

Egad
If you haven't figured that out by now, maybe you should give this whole computer thing up.
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gonjah wrote:

Hi, He had all the plans but has not been executing it being too busy or lazy? Hope he learned a big lesson by now, LOL!
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On 7/27/13 5:55 PM, Stormin Mormon wrote:

Or use old technology like real photographs, pencil, paper, and real books. Seventy five percent of adults prefer real books according to this: http://tinyurl.com/mtg5wbt Old story, possibly even true. Supposedly NASA spent a lot of money creating a pen that would write in the almost zero gravity of space. The Russians gave their cosmonauts pencils.
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That's why the Soviet economy failed: not enough stimulus.
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On 7/27/2013 7:34 PM, Dean Hoffman > wrote:

Actually, they still do. They'll discontinue support for XP on April 8, 2014.

That's a Rasmussen poll. Rasmussen poll participants trend older. They're less likely to adopt new trends and new technology than, say, their grandkids. They probably still watch movies on VHS tape and DVDs while their grandkids are watching them streamed to their phones and computers.
The move to digital products, including e-books, is huge and is being driven by demand. Students prefer e-books since they don't have to actually visit a library to check them out, they can find the information they're researching very quickly in the book using a simple search command, and they don't need to lug around heavy textbooks anymore. Plus, they can be read on most mobile devices. Basically the same reasons more and more people prefer to buy or rent digital copies of music and movies instead of buying them in physical format.
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<stuff snipped>

Part of the benefit of old-fashioned text research is that you invariably learned a lot just looking for something and skimming over lots of material to find it. I find that though most people can find what they are looking for on the net but they're not always good at evaluating the quality of that material. It used to be people would quote Wikipedia and get dissed, but Wikipedia looks downright scholarly compared to Yahoo Answers or Answers.com.
--
Bobby G.



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On Tue, 30 Jul 2013 20:41:18 -0400, "Robert Green"

The beauty of the internet is there is so much information available. The bad part is sorting truth from falsehood is like sorting flyshit from pepper.
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On Sat, 27 Jul 2013 18:55:28 -0400, Stormin Mormon wrote:

There is a ton of XP information and support on the web without needing Microsoft. Win7 and up are very much Android copy cats for social networking and entertainment media. They are not very friendly to commerce and industry which is hanging on to XP. Lots of info out there.
Wipe the disk (I assume you have your data backed up), and reinstall XP. Outlook, sad as it is, is part of that. It will be just as it was the first time you opened it. If MS has stopped authenticating new XP installs (I'd be surprised) there are quite a few pirate applications out there that will do it without even going on line. You did realize your XP would be obsolete some day and make provisions, didn't you?
===== The process going forward.
Get two hard drives. Either new or toughly wiped. XP stashes stuff in a small hidden partition at the end of the drive and format doesn't touch that. You can delete all the partitions (FDISK) and recreate them which will kill Gate's little stash.
Put one as your system hard drive.
Partition, format, and install your OS as per normal. Probably your install CD will do all that for you.
Install and configure all your applications the way you want it. Not your data, just runable applications.
When that is to your satisfaction, clone it to the second drive and put that away. HD Clone is one of several applications that do this. The free version is intentionally slow, it's an overnight or next day project, but it gets the job done and the price is right. You can run it from a floppy (or I think, a USB stick) so you don't need to put it on your computer. There are other similar programs.
If your drive takes a dump just put in the back up. Replace - don't add- or the infection might spread. If the old drive if physically good - just logically screwed up - go through the process to make it the backup clone. If it's physically toast, buy a new drive and do the same.
You always have a hot spare ready to go.
===== If you want a modest sized system there are several pages out there telling how to install XP to a flash drive. It's not simple because XP doesn't want to allow that, but the instructions are clear. That lets you plug your stick into any computer that boots from USB and run it like a "live CD". And your apps will look and act the same way regardless of computer. USB sticks are getting cheap enough, several can be your second and third backup.

Why? You can still get service packs from MS. http://support.microsoft.com/kb/322389
Good idea to have them stashed locally too. Think EMP event (or terrorist hack) that takes out the internet for a year.
Each of my computers backs up a different computer so I can always get at what I need to fix the one in trouble. Which hasn't happened in lots of years. Another thing I do is all my install files are on both a set of DVDs and a backup drive that normally lives in a drawer. Complete with text files with username, S/N, and various other things the install will ask for. I can install my whole suite to a virgin computer from either without recourse to the network.

See above. Good advice but I personally have everything covered with a triple backup. I learned my lesson long ago when the computer took a dump.
That was long before the last time you told us about losing everything to a virus problem and advised us to backup. Don't read your own posts, I assume.
By the way, that virus you got a couple years ago was from a website that someone had posted a link to and it turned out the website was compromised to push malware. I got the same thing you did and fixed it manually after about 15 minutes googling for info. You claimed it physically destroyed your HD and bought a new one. Stop bitching about MS (as much as they richly deserve it) and practice safe computing.
I like XP and I ain't changing come hell or high water until it's unavoidable. I assume computers will divide into personal entertainment machines and server based commercial operations. That means the generic desktop will likely cease to exist. Word to the wise.
I assume I will be abandoned and on my own by MS and all the applications vendors and have provided for that. It has to happen someday.
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Minor correction...Outlook is not, Outlook EXPRESS is. Two different programs.
--

dadiOH
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wrote:

You are correct. Stormin' likes OE because it does e-mail and usenet. So Outlook wouldn't be what he wants.
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wrote:
<Snip>

<Snip>
Winston,
Will you please say more about this? I've heard a lot about this, but I never have understood what I've heard. All education will be appreciated.
Thanks in advance,
--
pilgrim

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