Backsplash Tiling Question

I'm remodeling my kitchen and had to remove the drywall. I'm planning on installing an 18" high tile backsplash above the counter tops. Should I install cement backer board in this section or just drywall?
Thanks
Kenny
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Cement backer board would be best.
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An 18" high backsplash? Seeing that most typical backsplashes are, like, somewhere around 6" or slightly more than that high, I'm led to wonder exactly what you plan on doing in that sink to warrant an 18" backsplash. Bathing wildlife? Kinky water sports in the sink? Water Jarts? What? Unless your or your wife is a goose, I can't imagine a backsplash needing to be quite that tall.
What you install as your underlayment -- either backer board or plain drywall -- seems kinda inconsequential and perhaps overkill since backer is usually only necessary for high- and continuous-water applications, like behind shower stalls. In fact, depending on what you have in mind for that space, I'd be looking more at whether to install backer vs. some good old-fashioned 1/2" or 3/4" plywood, maybe, not drywall. In your case, sealing the final layer of tile and grout really well to ward off the occasional spill or spray would sem to suffice, unless I'm just all wrong or slightly misguided about this whole thing.
AJS

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wrote:

Not odd at all. I have tiled countertops and the same tile up the wall from countertop to cupboard-bottom. About 18" except under the window, where it's more like 10-12".
Sorry I can't answer the OP's question. The work was done by a contractor and I wasn't paying attention.
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AJScott writes:

Yeah, that's standard "full backsplash".
http://www.truetex.com/formica.htm
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Wow, cool. What a great idea.
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Yes, about 12 years ago, we redid our whole kitchen. We have tiled countertops with the tile going all the way up the wall to the upper cabiniets, i.e. and 18" backsplash. Anyway, we really like the look and functionality.
John Hines wrote:

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Ok, but what to do when the counter runs past the upper cabinet, and the wall runs all the way to the ceiling?
Is there a clean way to top it off? I guess, just like one would a shorter backsplash.
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On Tue, 23 Dec 2003 13:14:31 -0600, John Hines wrote:

Bullnose tile or trim
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John Hines writes:

Bullnose, border, listello, or chair-rail trim tiles.
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As others have pointed out, there are rounded edge tiles, bullnose, that finish off an otherwise, unfinished edge. I did this on a verical line from the left side of the upper cabinet to the left side of the lower cabinet. Where the lower cabinet goes "past the upper cabinet" you have to run you tiles which ever way looks best in your setting. Running up to the ceiling might look good, but I really can't visualize your particular case. I have a window that 'interupts' the upper cabints. So, in my case, I ran the tile all the way up and framed out the window in tile ... looks pretty slick.
John Hines wrote:

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Thanks (to all). I'm getting some great ideas here.
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Drywall should be fine. Cement backer is overkill for an area that seldom experiences much moisture.
There are two other options if you decide that drywall is not the right choice.
1. greenboard - water resistant drywall
2. Denshield, a water proof competitor to cement board that is infinitely easier to work with and the same cost. It water resistant drywall with a waterproof fiberglass type coating. Available at HD.
There's also Rhino board which is rated to wet locations but for some reason they never mention using it on walls, just floors and counter-tops.
RS
Disclaimer: Not an professional, just a DIY'er.
Kenny wrote:

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I used backer board over the top of the sheetrock, just because of the added stiffness, but thinner material. I tiled up to the countertops for the looks, form over function!

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