Back Yard Patio


4 inches of agrogate poured conctete with rebar Expansion joints
Is this right?
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Not even close.
I think you mean "aggregate" and "concrete".
But more important, pavers are the way to go. Concrete heaves, cracks, and is difficult to repair.
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Dan Espen wrote:

If it is installed correctly, it never needs repair. (well, not in your lifetime, at least.) If it fails, it was underdesigned or improperly installed.
-- aem sends...
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On Fri 01 Aug 2008 08:46:49p, aemeijers told us...

Very true. My parents had an extensive concrete patio that was nearly 50 years old and nary a crack or damage of any kind. I had a similar one that was over 20 years old in the same condition. This was in NE Ohio where weather certainly could have been a factor if the patio wasn't properly installed.
OTOH, I concrete would not be my first choice based on appearance. It's dull and uninteresting looking, unless it's been done by a company who specializes in patterned and stained concrete.
--
Wayne Boatwright
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Chuckled when I once heard said, "There are two kinds of concrete - the kind that's cracked and the kind that's gonna crack."
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Red Green wrote:

IMHO, 'properly installed' includes troweled-in (not sawn in green concrete) expansion joints. deep enough to control where cracks happen. If it is at the bottom of a 3/4 V groove, who gives a rip about a harline crack?
aem sends...
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writes:

Everyone is correct. From the OP writing in asking if 4" of "agrogate" was proper, I would infer that he/she/it isn't really up to speed on concrete and all its nuances, let alone contents.
There are lots of things to consider when choosing a patio/walkway, etc:
Motif, weather, drainage, availability of materials, skill, cost, what one wants in the finished product, etc.
To each his own. For me, I'd do pavers. Concrete is dated, plain, dull, not hip with the decorating crowd, and one can have lots of big problems with concrete that will make it look like hell in a short time.
MHO, YMMV
Steve
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On Fri, 1 Aug 2008 13:21:43 -0400, "someguy469"
Separate the aggregate from subsoil with landscape cloth. Power tamp the aggregate until it will give no more.

In most cases I'd prefer pavers- but there are a few variables. Who is doing the work? What is the frost heave probability? How long you gonna live there?
Jim
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pavers and the plants growing between them? Concrete is better

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On Fri, 1 Aug 2008 12:00:18 -0700 (PDT), snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

Paver maintenance- 30 minutes once a year to kill/prevent weeds. Concrete maintenance- probably need to seal once a year.
Paver repair- remove paver, replace. Concrete repair- remove patio, replace.
I prefer the look of pavers over almost any concrete I've seen. There are some great concrete jobs, but I doubt the OP is about to call one of the artists who do those beautiful jobs.
I have seen functional DIY concrete work- but never beautiful. Pavers, OTOH, lend themselves perfectly to 'learn on the job', DIY types.
Jim
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wrote:

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Seal concrete? Never
As for replacing that paver, make sure you have spares because they may not be available in two or ten years.
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Landscape cloth just before the pavers will help to keep down the weeds. There's RoundUp for everything else. And I think anyone with any artistic ability at all, a tile saw, or at least a brick chisel and hammer, could come up with a unique design so that when someone asked, "Wow, who did that?", they could say proudly, "I did." This stuff isn't rocket surgery. The hardest part is getting the sand in, compacted, and to grade. After that, it's just put the bricks in place, and even with a pattern or cutting some bricks(pavers/whatever), it don't have to be exact. If you can draw it on graph paper, and know anything about a protractor, square, triangle, and a mechanical pencil, you can make your own design and transfer it pretty darn close onto the real field.
When I did wrought iron work, I'd tell the customer that the proper viewing point was across the street. What the neighbor or passerby would see. Once you back up a bit from any work, the flaws and mistakes blend in unless they're just terrible.
Steve
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wrote:

I'm a big paver fan in terms of price and ease of installation DIY. I just want to say that the landscape cloth does work, but it's only good for maybe two years before the infernal pests work their way to the surface. Be prepared to pulll them out after heavy rains, carefully separating the pavers with an old flat-head screwdriver so you can yank out the roots. The lazy way is to pour boiling water on them, which really does work for a while (and costs a lot less in many ways than RoundUp).
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