Back up sump pump drain to laundry sink

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On Friday, December 25, 2015 at 2:28:07 AM UTC-5, Stormin Mormon wrote:

Maybe it was the daughter and SIL that failed and they couldn't figure out what to do.
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On 12/25/2015 7:36 AM, trader_4 wrote:

Or a flood of magnitude beyond what a pump can handle. If the water rises 2' above the generator you are SOL anyway.
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On Friday, December 25, 2015 at 9:06:14 AM UTC-5, Ed Pawlowski wrote:

we had a 100 year storm, people who were home spent 2 days bailing their sumps.
altogether unnecessary....... since most homes sith well above streets, they could of put in a overflow line....
to just drain the excess water if the pump fails for any reason
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replying to Stormin Mormon, Kathy wrote: I have sump and still flooded because the water was coming in faster than it could pump out, record rain in small amount of time, the whole neighborhood flooded not just me, so does not mean system sucked, my systems great I have battery back up too, but I thought my system failed I went outside and sure enough sump was putting water out, just could not keep up with water flow that's how hard it rained, my mom who had never flooded in all her years at her house flooded too, first and last time EVER having water in her home, so.... but I do have another problem... My sump pump drains into my neighbor's driveway and always leave the puddle at the bottom of her driveway in the summer I can attach a hose and reroute it away, but in the winter I can't attach a discharge hose because if it freezes it'll back up this winter the water on a driveway froze and she almost fell, I don't know what to do to fix it, offered to put more gravel on her DRIVEWAY, any thoughts????
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On Thursday, April 14, 2016 at 1:44:07 PM UTC-4, Kathy wrote:

Typically that problem is solved by having the discharge hose/pipe installed so it's pitched downward for the entire run. Then water doesn't stay in it to freeze. Why your sump pump discharge is running into the neighbor's driveway at all is another issue. Regarding the sump pump system not sucking, it would seem to me that if it can't keep up with worst case rainfall, then it does suck. Sump pumps come in different capacities, you can have more than one too if necessary. Discharge hose might be part of the issue too, if it can't support the full pump rate. If the neighborhood actually flooded, ie a stream, pond overflowed, there was water pooled on the ground everywhere, etc then that's a different story.
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On 12/24/2015 11:08 PM, snipped-for-privacy@att.net wrote:

Do you check their *efficacy*? Or, just "that they work" (make noise and appear to move water)? Impellers often get "gunked up" over time so the motor can be running (or trying to) but no/little water is moving.
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replying to Don Y , GeoEngineering wrote:

Efficiency. I would venture a guess and say that the average home owner would not be able to gage a pump's efficiency beyond the bigger the efficiency number the better it is. And even if I had the background to be able make sense of how much fluid is being moved, in comparison to the amount of electricity that is being expended, what would I do with this ? If I chose a pump which was rated at a higher efficiency, above a pump rated at a lower efficiency,,, what am I really choosing? Because what I am really concerned with is the flow rate of the pump, not how little electricity it is using at a given flow rate. If I found an aquarium pump that had a 100 percent efficiency but it only moved a tea cup of water a minute,, what use is that? For most of us, our electricity is supplied at whatever rate we use it, of course, within a given range. And how would I really be able to compare my "gunked up" pump flow rate, to the "un-gunked up" flow rate? What home owner would be able to place a flow meter on the pump output, or even put a current meter on the electric line feeding the pump,,, much less, do this "before" and "after", and be able to make a judgement based on the pumps efficiency which excluded all the other factors that have a bearing on the efficiency? Making a decision that, "my pump isn't doing enough" , would be as far as we need to go to decide we need a better pump, whether that means a bigger pump, or a higher flow rate, or both. When I hear that the pump is running, and I can see the water level in the sump going down, then it's working. My pump is hard-piped into the sump, so even picking it up to visually check the impeller would be an issue,, not to mention, the amount of time to remove, and then re-install it would be way longer than the amount of time it takes for the sump to fill up. I'd be knee deep in no time. It's true that, eventually we need to replace the pump. Sometimes there is "gunk" that clogs things up,, but it's not like "gunk" only adheres to impellers. If some type of material is building up,, it's probably building up all throughout the system, pipes, pump, and sump.
The problem I have with the answers that get posted on these forums is that the answers are being posted in a vacuum of not enough details surrounding the original questions. It's easy to say, that the proper way to get rid of the water is to pipe it across the front lawn and into the sewer. But these very specific answers don't address the varied and sometimes complicated situations that present themselves. Things like, the house is 60 years old, and whatever they did with water back then, may be different than what we should do now,,,, and some basements are dugout after the house was built, so having the proper lines isn't always an option. Not to mention, the cost of doing the exact right thing at any given time,, not all of us have an unlimited supply of money to address a problem with the latest technology nor the with expert advice. Sometimes a home owner is doing the best they can with what they have to work with, and the fact that they listed the flow rate of their pump incorrectly,, and then he gets slammed because he doesn't realize that the unrealistic flow rate looks unusual to some who have experience and see immediately that the flow rate is way too big.
In the same way that water powered pumps are described as the end all and be all of pump backups, none one mentions that if you live in an area that's been around for say,, hundreds of years,, and the water systems though out the area regularly has breaks that cause water outages that last for days and days,, well then, water powered pumps are of little value. As opposed to the battery backups that,, use a car battery, and even if the battery died, I could swap it out in my car for a recharge while the car battery is running the battery backup pump.
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On Friday, December 25, 2015 at 10:44:05 AM UTC-5, GeoEngineering wrote:

I think he posted what he meant, "efficacy", not "efficiency". I don't even recall seeing energy efficiency numbers posted for sump pumps.

I've never encountered an area where the municipal water system regularly breaks and is out for days and days. Might exist somewhere, where it's very unreliable, but it's the exception, not the rule. Even places with old system, eg NYC, you might have a break in one area that puts them without water for a day, but it's not a regular thing. And it would also have to happen at the same time the power is out, odds of that are extremely low.

That is an advantage, assuming you're there to do the swap.
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On 12/25/2015 8:44 AM, GeoEngineering wrote:

No, efficacy: the ability to produce a desired or intended result.
Efficiency determines how *well* it produces that result (in units of watts per gallon moved, gallons per minute, etc.)
the ratio of the useful work performed by a machine or in a process to the total energy expended or heat taken in.

You typically don't care how "efficient" it is -- as long as it can meet your expected "water movement" needs and do so without consuming massive quantities of electricity in the process. Hard to imagine a unit sold that would fail in obvious ways (assuming you read the rating plate prior to purchase).
OTOH, it is relatively easy to encounter one that has become plugged with debris from use and is no longer EFFECTIVE.

Your problem lies in not understanding my choice of words: efficacy. Go back and reread what I wrote. Then, realize how much of what *you* wrote doesn't belong as a reply to my comment. :>

And, who's responsibility is it to provide that level of detail? Should folks spend many posts trying to tease out every little detail from the OP's prior to offering a suggested remedy? Ever notice how INFREQUENTLY the OP's don't rejoin the conversation to say what they've done and what the results may have been?

And code may not allow water to be routed "as desired"; tying in to a sanitary sewer *or* storm sewer may be prohibited, locally. Or, those connections may require check valves, etc.
Here, water falling on your property is *your* problem. When your lot is graded, *you* have to ensure the water -- including any potential runoff -- is handled appropriately. You will often encounter "developments" that have set aside significant portions of real estate (as in, "why didn't they put yet another house on that seemingly empty lot?") as catchment basins to handle the "overflow" from the typical downpours we get during Monsoon.
[We have very few "storm sewers" so runoff runs down the STREET. This poses a hazard to drivers who are frequently swept away by this volume of water -- ~6 inches to float a car...]

Lack of funds isn't a defense against failure to comply with Code.

The short answer to your rant: if you want a customized answer for your particular circumstances, local regulatory requirements, etc. then you ask/hire a plumber.
The advice you receive via USENET (or any other similar "forum") is worth EXACTLY what you paid for it!
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