Back prime T-111 siding in PA?

My thoughts on the pros and cons of back priming T-111 siding that will go over Tyvek house wrap and cover a small stud framed cottage.
Back prime, pros, moisture from house will stay out of siding and reduce paint peeling. Cons, extra paint and time. Moisture may be trapped in wall causing premature rot of wall sheathing.
Don't back prime, pros, save money and time. Moisture will tend to rot out the easier to replace T-111 siding and not the wall sheathing. Cons, paint may blister faster as moisture tries to escape beneath paint.
Thank you for any thoughts on the matter you might share with me.
P.S. Seems like the proper application would call for 1x3 diagonal sleepers to be installed first and then the back primed siding. This would solve both potential problems (rot and paint blistering) or is that over kill. I guess this would also cause some detail problems around the windows and door?
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andy everett wrote:

Had one more thought, don,t paint either side and let siding weather? Cottage can breath, save time and money up front but reduce the lifespan of siding.
Help! 8^)
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andy everett wrote:

Especially not an option with OSB-core faux t-111 like this place has. Only way I would consider going bare-ass is with cedar (or in the old days, redwood), or other similar hardy woods, in clapboard or board'n'batten. Ply or OSB will delaminate in a year or less, unless you are in a shady desert.
Have you looked at the pre-coated T-111s like they use on sheds and cheap apartment buildings? Modern variant of hardboard siding, basically, but with a plastic weather coat. The 12 years I lived in my brand-new apartment building before moving here, they never repainted the field areas, and it seemed to hold up okay. If this is just a fishing cabin or something, it may be good enough. (and you can always side right over it.)
aem sends...
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Built my 2 story garage with T-111 17 years ago, then applied solid stain. Not a bubble, no cracks no rot. Finally restained last year, only because color had faded. Used Behr solid stain, BTW, both times.
I'd skip the back priming.
Curmudgeon

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andy everett wrote:

Back prime the siding. This causes the siding to take in moisture and release moisture at the same, or close to the same rate, on front and back. This increases the lifespan of the paint.
The diagonal sleepers could just be lathe and don't have to be diagonal. They can be vertical and accomplish the same thing. The rainguard system (with the lath and breathable space) will increase your profile and require you to extend the jambs of windows and doors to accomodate the systems increased thickness.
If it were me, I would just backprime the siding and nail it up. But if you have the time, money and inclination, install the rainguard system.
In summation, the backpriming will contribute to the effectiveness of the paint on your siding, extending its life, therefore extending the protections against moisture intrusion, therefore protecting the underlying sheathing.
--
Robert Allison
Rimshot, Inc.
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