B&D Sawzall

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Good Day... I have a B&D Model 3105 Sawzall which requires the speed reducing spider gear replaced. The part is too expensive to buy new so I was hoping someone had a non-repairable saw that would part with the gear. Several different models have the same part. Please send an email if you do. Thanks.
Search terms: Black and Decker, B&D, reciprocating saw, cut saw
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No you don't. We just went through this on another group. You have a reciprocating saw, not a Milwaukee brand Sawzall.
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Edwin... Your simply moronic! I have already proven to you that the majority of people use the term "Sawzall" generically. Therefore, go away so I can get the part to fix this thing, period.
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You are just plain wrong, as are others that use the term Sawzall for other brands of reciprocating saw. Just because I chose to use proper terminology, that does not make you or them any less wrong. My mention of it should not affect you ability to get the part so there is no need for me to go away. I like it here so I plan to be here, long after you go away. Your friend always, Ed
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Ryton wrote:

He didn't say anything moronic at all.

Absolutely incorrect. Sawzall is a live registered trademark of the Milwaukee Electric Tool Corporation, as it has been since 1970 or so. As such, they have the exclusive right to use the term Sawzall and control how it is used. If it was used generically and they did not act to protect their trademark it would have been lost.

if you don't understand trademarks or what a Sawzall is.
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Jeff wrote:

And nobody calls an off-brand paper tissue a "Kleenex" in your house, either, I presume... :)
Or you never went to the drive-in in to get a "coke" which might just turn out to have been a Pepsi?
Chill, man...whether you want to admit it or not and despite Big Red's attempts, a reciprocating saw _is_ pretty much generically known as a sawzall...
That it is a registered TM is only something Milwaukee can protect from actual corporate infringement--they'll have no luck whatsoever in common usage, even if they were foolish enough to try.
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Duane Bozarth wrote:

I always said tissue myself.

Usually they'll correct you.

I'm chilled, not to worry.

Actually there you're wrong. You see, if Milwaukee didn't protect their trademark and allowed it to be used as a generic term, under US Law they could and would lose their trademark. Otis Elevator Company lost their trademark "escalator" many years ago because they didn't take action when it became used as a generic term. Since Milwaukee has kept their trademark for 35 years or so, they're doing something right to protect it from generic use. You'll find that other companies like Xerox do their diligence too, if you wrote something in a public document somewhere that referred to a generic copier as a Xerox machine, they would get in touch with you when they found it with a polite cease and desist letter. They have teams of people to watch out for it. Again the law requires them to do this to protect their rights to their own name. Put up a generic Jakes Brake sign, and Jacobs Vehicles Systems will get in touch with you when they become aware of it, etc.
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Well Jeff... You have now convinced me that you and Mr. Ed (pun intended) share the same horse suit and take turns as the hind quarters. As stated previously, I don't care about the trademark issue, only that the most people see my part request. Unfortunately, thanks to the two of you, it's buried under all this horse shit!
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You should thank us for all the publicity you got. Free stuff does not come cheap you know. As for the pun, I've heard it for so many years it is humorous to me when the kiddies use it.
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The Coca Cola company has taken many a restaurant to court for such violations. A big one was the Friendly's chain in New England about 10 or 12 years ago. If you asked for a Coke, you were told something like "we serve Friendly Cola, not Coke, would you like one?" Eventually it because such a PITA that Friendly succumbed and now served Coke.
Use the word Styrofoam generically for foamed plastics in the newspaper and Dow Chemical's lawyers will be on your ass too. They have people that search out such violations. And don't as Granny to embroider a Disney character on your kid's T shirt because they will cuff her and cart her off to jail too.
Just because others have slovenly habits does not make it right for others to be that way.
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To show the idiocy of this all:
If you need a Sawzall, or a reciprocating saw, what do you ask for when looking for it?
I know the difference, yet when seeking an item, I ask for a Sawzall. The technogeek usually says, yes, we handle Milwaukee Tools, or, we don't have Sawzalls, but have several other brands of reciprocating saws.
Only a doofus or a newbie is lost in such a conversation. Everyone else knows what is being said.
Oh, I forgot to include lawyers and wannabes. They will argue the point ad nauseum.
Steve
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Hi Steve... Kudos!
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My "rule of thumb" is to say what you mean and mean what you say. I'd ask for a Sawzall because I'm only interested in buying the Milwaukee brand as it is still the best made. If I was looking for a less expensive brand for someone that rarely uses such a tool, I'd ask for a recipricating saw.

You know the difference. An educated person pandering to the lowest common denominator? Say it isn't so.

I'm not a big fan of lawyers, but I do have respect for grammar teachers. Proper use of our language is the best and most accurate way to communicate. I prefer not to compromise myself. You may do as you please.
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I guess you don't get out much, do you?
My experience lately with sales people is that you absolutely have to stoop to whatever level you have to to conduct the transaction. You have to spell things out. You have to explain things in exact detail. You can't even give the cashier $21.36 for a $16.36 purchase because that confuses them too much.
In our experience, who really goes in and speaks proper English when dealing with a sales geek that speaks English as a second language? Or who speaks Eubonics, or Street GenX? Who asks for EXACTLY what they want when they are dealing with a young salesperson that hasn't got a clue what you're talking about.
The things you suggest may happen in a perfect world, Edwin. Just not on this planet.
STeve
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So you'd rather just cave in and let the "know nothings" rule the retail world? I guess I'm not one to just take the easy way out and not do things the proper way. The more we stoop to the lowest common denominator, the lower it goes. I try to maintain high standards, difficult as it is at times.
Our education system is one of the worst in industrialized nations. Much is attributable, IMO, to the acceptance of second rate learning. I think a "C" is just getting by, but some parents think that is plenty good for junior and praise him for it. We push the kids out of school and turn them loose on the working world with sub-standard skills. As long as we accept that, nothing will improve. We may never have the perfect world, but it sure as hell can be better if we make an effort.
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wrote in message

Edwin, I agree 105% with what you are saying. In high school, I was in honor English all four years. And at a time when only three years of English was required. I learned proper English from a perfectionist. I enjoy being able to speak, communicate, and write in proper form. I pride myself in my spelling and grammar, although at times I do get a little lax.
In this world, it is nice to go about one's business with pride and confidence. It doesn't mean squat to others, but within my own skin, it makes ME feel a lot better.
That being said, it brings us to the rest of the world. I was in downtown LA, where I saw a building that had "Stationary Store" on the front. It is still there. How many people here get it?
I see professionally made signs, metallic car door business ads, billboards, and newspaper items that are misspelled or have bad grammar. I still get the message, although it gives me a chuckle.
When I was a supervisor in the Gulf of Mexico, my crews were people from "da wooods" of Louisiana, Arkansas, Alabama, Georgia, Mississippi, Texas, and wherever. I had to adapt my speech to get the message across to them. Sure, they understood good and proper English, yet something was lost in the relationship.
A good salesman, a good supervisor, a good leader, and a good socializer adjusts to the audience.
Forever being proper is a boor that turns off most people. It certainly does me, and I rate myself as a rather intelligent person.
Yes, things today aren't what they used to be. Welcome to reality. Cope. Change.
When one stops changing and adapting, they die, because they become stuck in time .........
Why bread used to be a quarter
Gas used to be fifteen cents
Cigars used to be a nickel
You get the picture.
WGAF?
No one.
Steve
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Of cousre is is still there; it cannot move ;)

Adaptation and change are good, but there are times to hold your ground. Knowing when makes the difference between success and failure. Adapting to achieve a goal is far different than accepting second rate behavior as being the norm and being good.
Want to become a part of the greatest Superpower the world has ever known? Learn Chinese. The world as we know it is going to be greatly changed in the next 25 to 50 years.
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Edwin Pawlowski wrote:

25-5-0 years, but neither I nor you know how. A flue epidemic could change everything and could even make the Chinese powerhouse irrelevant in world economics. The Islamic fundamentalist problem (terror) could change everything that we know or now anticipate. And don't forget science. What new inventions equivalent to, air planes, computers, antibiotics, etc will be widely available and used in less than 50 years. Plan on the Chinese taking over and it may turn out to be the Indonesians. Could even be the French, but that thought is too horrible to contemplate.
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"Edwin Pawlowski"> wrote

Heh, true. If the latino's don't overpopulate this place first. Hopefully I will be gone by then.
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It is so in so many ways. Poor speech. Poor manners. Poor driving.

Then the first thing to do would be throw out the teacher's union, but that ain't gonna happen.
We can only set our own standards, and answer to ourselves. When we do otherwise, we become liberals.
Steve
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