Auxiliary water-heater tank? ? ?

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On Tue, 22 Dec 2009 10:32:48 -0500, Van Chocstraw

There may not be much sunshine in his basement.
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Just get a used electric water heater tank - say 50 gallons. Then remove all the insulation around the tank. Remove the electrical wiring.
-or-
Buy a new water tank which can be pressurized to city water pressure levels. (I think water heater tanks are tested to 300 psi, but actual pressure would be from 30 psi to 100 psi.)
Then connect this tank *before* your existing water heater.
This would be pointless upstairs in the winter. You would be using more house heating to warm the tank. In an unheated basement or furnace room, might reduce expenses? And of course in the summer, it would be a money saver if the city water temperature is colder than your house temperature.
More savings would be with a "heat exchanger" tank and a solar water heating system.
"Ray" wrote in message

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How does a heat exchanger tank work, in both summer/winter? Configuration?
How about this, just for the summer, apropos of heat exchange:
Take a hundred feet or so of copper tubing, in a helix or some some compact "serpentine" configuration, with a fan, on a drip pan for the condensate, somewhere in the house, which would preheat the water, cool and dehumidify the house?
The problems with this are finding a spot to do this, and then the fact that relatively little water will actually be used, as there is not constant flow. But if the above could be done cheaply enough....
Also, I would do this for both the hot AND cold water -- after all, does anyone really need cold-cold water?
Mebbe the start of a three-line faucet: hot/cold/tepid..... :)
--
EA




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Could have used this when living at 10,000 feet in Colorado mountains. Incoming water temp in winter was 35 F and in summer 38 F. Frost line was 9 feet deep and people had lots of frozen sewer lines that were not deep enough. WW
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Is the technology avalaible? Having a rooftop black tank and a mini water heater is standard affair in Mexico and other countries that dont have alot of extra cash. I took an old water heater stripped the insuation and use it to temper incomming water, it goes up by maybe 6f in a day. But you will need a tray under it to drain when it swets in summer if your basement gets humid. Maybe a cheap uninsulated Well tank will work. In summer you will save a bit.
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wrote:

Is the technology avalaible? Having a rooftop black tank and a mini water heater is standard affair in Mexico and other countries that dont have alot of extra cash. I took an old water heater stripped the insuation and use it to temper incomming water, it goes up by maybe 6f in a day. But you will need a tray under it to drain when it swets in summer if your basement gets humid. Maybe a cheap uninsulated Well tank will work. In summer you will save a bit.
Keep in mind water would freeze further up north. For solar water heating systems, they use a closed loop of antifreeze to go to a heat exchanger water heater. Keeps the antifreeze solution in the lines and on the roof separate from the hot water which you might use for cooking, etc.!
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heat conduction is largely a matter of exposure area which is why collectors tend to be large and thin
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