Aux. water tanks

My friend lives in an area where city water fails when electric power fails (at least it has in the past).
What are the options available for single family homes to provide "off the grid" water for a few days at least for a family of 3 or 4? I assume that you'd need some tanks and bypass valves and a battery operated pump. Anyone know how much that might cost.
Any leads or ideas would be appreciated. I'll be Googling on several factors, especially the hazards of bio-nasties growing in large tanks of water. I'm assuming these tanks would be on line and thus constantly have the water changing just like a standard water heater.
TIA,
-- Bobby G.
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Robert Green wrote:

Long thread a few months back about "stocking up" or the like.
I'll spare you the long, sad tale but I had a big storage tank that went bust. I now keep water in 1 Gal water jugs on shelving in the garage. Rotate the stock and FIFO.
Jim
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The best option I know of is to hook up a bladderless 50-gallon pressure tank like the ones they use for well-systems, with a check-valve on the city-side of it so it can't drain backwards, and *NOT* pressurise the system. Set it up on a pedestal at least 18" high.
When the water shuts off, you open a faucet upstairs, then go down into the basement with a bucket, and collect the water you need from the sill-cock on the pressure tank.
This assumes that your hot water heater is off when the power's out, too. If it's not, you have to make sure that you don't somehow drain that, else loud noises may result.
If you expect to need more water than that, consider sinking a well, and stocking up on chlorine and iodine.
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In a pure emergency one needs about 1.5 gallons of water or liquids a day to live. for drinking only.
hygiene, washing hands etc can take many times that.
I am drilling a well this summer for just this situation, right behind my home. water grass, plants etc. in a emergency use in home for hygiene toilet flushing etc.
always have some bottled water around for drinking in emergency
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In Korea, I have seen huge 300 gallon tanks on the roofs in rural areas. They have something similar to a toilets valve...as the water level drops, the valve opens and lets in the city water to fill the tank. If the city water stops, there is still three hundred gallons on the roof in the tank. All the water pressure to the house is provided by gravity since it is roof mounted. Really a simple idea. No batteries or turning valves or nothing. You wouldnt even know if the city water was off or not.
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