Automobiles

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Some newer vehicles have really wierd battery locations.
Put vehicle on lift, up it goes:)
Remove left front wheel
Remove inner fender liner
Access battery and replace.
Sears charges 125 bucks for install on these and it must be worth it.
dont worry the indian vehicles for 4 grand and chinese 8 grand with 100,000 mile warranty are coming. vehicles will be like everything else, disposable............
the batter has failed, time for a new car............
GM is closing dealers en mass............
they will be reopening as chinese and india vehicles............
GM doesnt have a prayer
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Brings new meaning to the old saying "Ta Ta for now" It will be Tata for good
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Where I live, there are HUGE price advantages to buying used. I bought a 5-year old, low mileage van for about 20% of what a new van would cost. I am now 2 years into it and have just now had must first repair that wasn't "regular maintenance".
***********************************************
At 5 years old, if it had 20,000 miles or less it may be a good deal, but most will have over 80,000 miles and a 20% discount is not a good deal. The first owner had the warranty and many trouble free miles that the second owner will not see.
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wrote:

Last one cost the original owner $38,000 to drive off the lot. I drove it 12 years, put MABEE $2000 into it in repairs, and sold it for $1700.
Wife's current car was purchased at 7 years of age for $5500. Whe've had it now for 6 years. I've put about $1500 into it for repairs, beyond normal maintenance. Original cost off the lot was about $24,000 Canadian. (V6, leather, sun-roof, all-speed traction control,CD, 4 wheel disk brakes, etc)
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I didn't get a 20% discount. I got an 80% discount. Van had about 65,000 miles. Two years later it now has twice that and just made first repair to it.
************************************
OK, somehow the 20% just stuck in the brain. Big difference.
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On Sat, 9 May 2009 18:54:30 -0700 (PDT), Pat

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On Sat, 9 May 2009 10:08:36 -0700 (PDT), against all advice,

I bought an expensive car. Hell, it was four years old and used, and it was still expensive, but it's *exactly* what I wanted and could afford. I expect that with regular maintenance it will run to at least 300,000 miles.
Only 250,000 more to go. I expect to get another sixteen years out of it, which is fourteen years with no car payments.
Buy a nice car and keep it. You'll be ahead in the long run.
--

Real men don\'t text.

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On Sat, 9 May 2009 10:08:36 -0700 (PDT), Pat

LOL. He want s a new truck so he has reasons.

Wow.

LOL.
I too usually buy a 7 year old car. I keep it about 7 years, and the two or three weeks are often pretty mournful.
I've only made 5 car payments in my life, and I'm 62 and have had a car since I was 20. One payment for each car. The first car was free from my cousin and the second free from my brother, but 5 cost money.
I used to drive 10,000 a year, now 7,000, not much, but I've spent about 12,000 on cars and maybe 10,000 on repairs in the last 35 years.
I always allow one or two thousand dollars for repairs when I buy a used cars but a couple have needed nothing for a year or two, and the most was 600 (30 years ago) for repairing the transmission.
First car was 650 and latest was 5300. All convertibles, which cost a little more.
Repairs include 3 transmissions by transmission shops, two convertible tops with labor, two tops where I did the labor, and one push rod. No engine work except one time:
The guy way back in 1980 wanted 150 dollars to open the engine and see why it was running rough. I took the valve cover off and saw that one push rod wasn't moving. It was broken. Bouht a narrow round magnet on a stick to go into the hole and bring out the part I couldn't see. Had bought a new push rod at the dealer. Car ran no better. I was tempted to give up then but after a day I recovered. Opened it again and the push rod was scrunched. Had to use pliers to pull it out of the hole. Back to the dealer, Oh they had two different push rods that year. This one worked. Didn't bother replacing valve cover gasket and it didnt' leak.
Replaced myself a distributor, a water pump, an alternator, a tie rod end. brake shoes once or twice, brake disks twice, master cylinder once (had to pay for a bit bleeding after that. I couldn't get it.) and a few other thigns I forget now.
Once fiddled with my carburetor and made it worse, and had to glue the linkage back together with epoxee. Worked fine for years afterwards. Once had a problem choke, and while on a 3=hour trip to New York, didn't have time to fix it right so I put the cap of a pen in the choke so the plate woudln't close completely. Drove that way until I sold the car, for 4 more years with no trouble, except when it was cold, I had to start it two or three times before it stayed running.
Current car started stalling a week after I bought it. It set a code which mentioned the MAP sensor. Wiggled it on its connector and it worked better. Used a plastic tie to hold it on firmly. Worked for five years until last may car stalled a couple times on may way to Texas. Plastic tie losing tension as it got used to bending around corners. Bent tie and wiggled sensor a bit with intention of fixing it right when I got back. A year later, have to remember to do that.
And I didn't even take care of these cars so well.
The two before this one, Chrysler LeBarons, when I sped around a corner and the oil light went on, I would add oil. One car had leak in power steering, and I drove without power steering off and on for a year, but every time I filled it up it worked just fine. Even when I has no fluid for 5000 miles, filling it up made it work fine. Mileage was still good the day before I junked it.
Last year two people told me I couldn't take my 95 Lebaron from Baltimore to Dallas and back but it worked just fine (except for the wiggling sensor).

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Pat wrote:

In my father's day they would change the oil in the back driveway, throw the empty cans and old filter in the garbage and pour the old oil down the sewer. Yup let's go back to those days.
With today environmental awareness it makes far more sense to run my vehicle into an oil change shop, have the work done inside of 1/2 an hour and be out. They have the facilities to handle the used oil and filter.
The rest of the car maintenance, i.e. tune-ups etc have now gone out of the hands of the everyday owner due to the implementation of all the high end technology. Besides I would rather spend the time with my kids.
--
PV

"Little men with little minds and little imaginations go through life
in little ruts, smugly resisting all changes which would jar their
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PV wrote:

i still put the cans and filter in the garbage. Where the hell else do you think they go? I do recycle the used oil. I pour it on my gravel driveways to control dust. Just like the county does.
s
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On Fri, 08 May 2009 15:14:26 -0500, Steve Barker

both Canada and the USA for over 20 years.
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Steve Barker wrote:

Well in my city, engine oil and used filters do not go in the garbage, they must be taken to the local eco-centre for proper disposal. Pouring oil on the road or driveway is also forbidden.
http://www.ecy.wa.gov/news/2006news/2006-089.html
A bit of info on the reasons why used motor oil should not be dumped on your driveway.
--
PV

"Little men with little minds and little imaginations go through life
in little ruts, smugly resisting all changes which would jar their
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on 5/8/2009 4:14 PM (ET) Steve Barker wrote the following:

I filter the old oil then pour it in my fuel oil tank.
--

Bill
In Hamptonburgh, NY
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wrote Re Re: Automobiles:

How do you do the filtering? What kind of filter and how do you pump the oil through the filter?
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Caesar Romano wrote:

No idea how it works with modern motor oils and their exotic additives, but in the old days 'waste oil' heaters were dirt common, and many rural repair shops heated the work areas with them. Kinda dirty and smelly, but so were the mechanics. :^)
Usual method was to just dump it in a barrel and let it sit, and only draw off the top 2/3 or so after the solids had settled out. Gravity is your friend. Not sure what they did with the outright sludge.
I'm sure EPA would be aghast at the concept these days. Even if you find a way to make sure the humans in the structure aren't breathing the fumes, the incomplete combustion products going up the flue must be off the scale. Only waste oil burning I have seen installed in recent years was where there was also another fuel source, and controls to make sure the burning stayed at a high enough temp to break down everything.
Standard disclaimer- I am not an engineer.
-- aem sends...
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on 5/9/2009 8:05 AM (ET) Caesar Romano wrote the following:

inside. Stick the funnel into a plastic fuel tank. Dump the oil into the funnel and let the oil drain through the cloth lined funnel. It will slowly drain in the tank and will take some time. Refill the funnel as necessary.
--

Bill
In Hamptonburgh, NY
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wrote Re Re: Automobiles:

Ok, the low-tech approach.
I have a neighbor who has been experimenting with recycling used motor oil through a standard home water filter. The oil comes out as clear looking as new motor oil. Then he mixes is with diesel fuel for his tractor. I didn't think to ask him how he pumps it through the filter. I'll have to do that the next time I see him.
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on 5/9/2009 12:50 PM (ET) Caesar Romano wrote the following:

Perhaps an air compressor to push the oil through the filter.
--

Bill
In Hamptonburgh, NY
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PV wrote:

You can still buy oil, filters and auto parts and do it yourself. No, We NEVER poured oil down the drain. I pour it back into the same containers and places take it that way for recycle or burning. You can buy a computer code decoder (I have one) and analyze your own problems and fix them. It's still not rocket science. If you can build your own computers you can fix your car too.
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the oil?
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