Automobile engine cleaning using mixture of kerosene and oil

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jasmin wrote:

OH and BTW, the kerosene procedure won't hurt. But it probably won't help either. Kerosene does not cut the varnish that causes sticky lifters.
s
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On Sat, 07 Feb 2009 13:50:25 -0600, Steve Barker

better though - and using ATF you can go to 25% if you are not going to drive it hard or long.

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wrote:

It still works. Just be carefull.
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I often throw a quart of ATF in about a week before the oil change. ATF is very high detergent, and will knock a lot of dirt loose,& hold it in suspension so when you do your oil change it gets flushed out. When you change your oil catch it after a highway run, the drain plug should be so hot you have a hard time handling it. I've done the flush kerosene flush, i can't say it is all that effective, & BTW diesel is pretty much oil and kerosene, so that works too.
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Might want to try a different brand of motor oil. I had a wicked piston rod knock in my last Blazer. Tried a couple different brand of oil, and tried heavier weights. Catsrol was the brand that quieted the rod knock for more than two days.
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I do field service for a living and drive vehicles till the wheels fall off. So far my highest mileage vehicle when retired to junk yard was a 1990 caravan with about 450,000 miles or so. A little unsure cause the odometer broke for awhile.:) Although It had a engine swap near the end, maybe 400,000 miles
In any case my older vans get noisey lifters etc. Slick 50 silences that, espically the noise after a vehicle sits for awhile./ I devote one van to big deliveries and back up if the primary one breaks....
Never checked mileage or temperature but that noise disappears.
I use it every few oil changes. so the cost isnt a killer
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On Sun, 8 Feb 2009 08:17:36 -0800 (PST), " snipped-for-privacy@aol.com"

Motor Honey, STP,, Bardahl 2, Lucas, or virtually any other VI improver would do the same job at a lot lower cost. 20W50 oil and the proper oil filter will do it too.
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wrote:

    Don't use that old 1950's trick. You are not driving a 1950's car. It can damage modern cars.
    There are a few additives that might be used as a last chance for a cheap fix, but don't expect too much. I would choose Marvel Mystery myself if I had to, but I suspect I would just really fix the problem.
    Modern engines are far different than the 50's. They demand different oils, many need synthetic oils.
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snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com wrote:

Pure bullshit. The bearings are still aluminum, the pistons are still aluminum, the crank is still cast iron. Other than the fact that the new engines are built a lot looser, for less friction, there is virtually no difference in the bottom end.
s
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On Tue, 10 Feb 2009 00:08:50 -0600, Steve Barker

    You are saying that the 1950's engines used aluminum pistons? I believe you will find that overall modern engines are a little tighter not looser.
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On Tue, 10 Feb 2009 10:14:40 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com wrote:

(chevy stovebolt was the biggest seller)
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snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com wrote:

'80's, and the general tolerances are wider. And yes, the 50's engines had aluminum pistons. Can't imagine they were ever anything else.
steve
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Steve Barker wrote:

Some very old engines had cast iron pistons, but that was many years ago. If there were any used in autos of the 50s, they must have been old designs even then. The oldest engine I've personally had apart was a Studebaker V-8 whose design dates to 1951; that had Al pistons. I suspect that the Commander six (1933-ish?) also did, but I don't trust my memory on that nor did a quick google confirm it.
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wrote:

- Also known as the "cast iron wonder" It got full pressure lube and hydraulic lifters back in 1953 (pwerglide only) and 1954
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On Tue, 10 Feb 2009 20:27:38 -0600, Steve Barker

check your specifications. Bearing clearances have stayed very close to what they have been ever since full pressure lubrication became standard and the running clearance of the pistons (when fully warm) is the same or a bit tighter. Cam ground, eliptical, and hypereutectic pistons have reduced piston slap when cold. Engines are only "looser" in that the rings provide less resistance (friction) because they are only half as wide as the "old school" piston rings, and the cyl wall and ring finishes are much finer - which contribute to the significantly reduced cyl wall wear. The "new generation" lubricants help get the most out of this new mechanical technology - but they will generally run just fine on the older oils - for a lot shorter time. The latest modification to engine oils, the removal of zinc high pressure friction reduction compounds, was mandated entirely for emmissions reasons, as the compounds required to keep the zinc in suspension poison the catalytic converters if the engines consume any of the oil - and with 0W30 and 5W20 oils SOME is going to get past the rings during the mandatedemissions guarantee period.
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On Tue, 10 Feb 2009 00:08:50 -0600, Steve Barker

oils are used. In reality they are built about the same, on average, but the tolerances are a lot better. MUCH more uniform.
The old oils will work, but not as long, and will foul up some of the new controls. Can't have high zinc oils any more because they foul up the catalytic converters if the oil is burned. Stuff like that.
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snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

the lubricating requirements. It saves gas when figured on a million engines at a time.
And you can't buy 'old' oil anyway. Nearly EVERY oil on the shelf has certification for every new engine.
steve
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On Tue, 10 Feb 2009 20:29:46 -0600, Steve Barker
..

    Sorry, but I can't really buy that. The lighter oils may be in part for better mileage but they are also for better protection.
    I wonder how many people realize that the first number is only used to describe the oil when it is cold and the second number describes the oil when it is at operating temperatures.

    Certainly not mine. I drive a diesel and it is picky about the oil it uses.

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On Thu, 12 Feb 2009 09:14:23 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com wrote:

Yes, so? what would be wrong with a 0W50 in place of a 5W20? Cold lubrication would be a non-issue because Ow flows better cold than 5W, and hot protection would be better because 50 doesn't thin out as much hot as 20 - The ONLY reason to use a 5W20 would be better fuel mileage due to thinner oil requiring less power to pump.

deisel oil. Otherwise MOST deisels will run any good C rated oil like Rotella T 15W40. And there is a fair bit of oil available out there that does not meet the latest and highest spec.

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On Thu, 12 Feb 2009 15:39:05 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

    All else being equal and assuming that 50W when hot would meet the needs of the engine and that 0 would not be too light when cold (hardly seems likely to me) than it should be fine.

    I use 5W40 CF Rotella myself, but that is for my 2002 TDI I don't believe it meets the requirements of the current 2009 VW US spec diesel.

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