Auto Headlight Restorer

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My older pickup truck has foggy headlights. This seems to be the result of poor manufacturing, since the older GLASS headlights never had that problem. But aside from bitching about it, there is little I can do to change what they put on my truck.
Anyhow, I'd like to do some sort of restore on them. I see these "As seen in TV" ads where they sell these kits, and charge an outrageous amount of shipping and handling. Anyhow, I dont buy any of that high priced crap.
I'm looking to either buy a product at a local Auto Parts store, Walmart, a Dollar store, or possibly ebay. My question is what is a good product for this? One that works well, is easy to use, and is priced fairly.....
Thanks
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On Mon, 11 May 2015 19:23:38 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@spamblocked.com wrote:

I just used some polish, not wax, that I had sitting around. That polished out the dull surface off the plastic and made them almost like new. I also bought some Turtle wax headlight sealer at Auto Zone and put that on after to protect it (supposedly) from degrading too fast again. Don't waste your time on any kits that use a drill to run a buffing ball or pad. You can easily enough buff it up with regular polish and some elbow grease and the sealer is around $8.
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I've tried buffing with rubbing compound and wax with fair success. A cheap kit I got with drill attachment worked fast and well. I don't think I actually tried wet sanding first before, but the stickon pads don't last too long if your doing multiple lights. Changing from sanding to buffer screws up the sticky.
Greg
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On 05/11/2015 06:23 PM, snipped-for-privacy@spamblocked.com wrote:

How bad are they? The G3000 kit requires sanding and buffing if they're really clouded.
(Amazon.com product link shortened)
Same deal, without the 1000 and 3000 grit sanding
(Amazon.com product link shortened)
And just the PlastX, buff it with your old underwear or something.
(Amazon.com product link shortened)
You should be able to find the Meguiar line in AutoZone, O'Reily, Walmart, etc./
3M's kit uses a drill motor for all the steps.
(Amazon.com product link shortened)
Disclaimer: I don't have any relationship with Amazon but it's the easier way to link to products with a number of reviews.
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On Monday, May 11, 2015 at 9:28:17 PM UTC-4, rbowman wrote:

I used the 3M product on weathered BMW headlights and it worked great. I think I bought it at Walmart, but lots of autoparts and similar have them. You have to have trust in it, because you start out with a coarser paper, initially making them worse. But that's what you have to do to take off the deteriorated surface. By the time you use the fine grit, they look real nice.
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On 5/11/15 8:23 PM, snipped-for-privacy@spamblocked.com wrote:

AFAIK, the sun damages all plastic headlights. The principal is first to remove the damaged plastic. One method is to use progressively finer wet sandpaper. When the damage is shallow, I've read that toothpaste can work.
A suitable polish coat can finish the job and slow further damage.
I like what rbowman said, to look at user reviews at Amazon. Then you can buy locally.
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wrote:

I heard about using toothpaste too. I tried that and it was a frigging mess. Maybe back in the day toothpaste was more like what I think of as polish but the toothpaste I tried is the modern kind where the bulk of it is a plastic based carrier and that plastic just balled up and made a sticky mess out of things.
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On Tuesday, May 12, 2015 at 2:50:48 PM UTC-4, Ashton Crusher wrote:

Also the kits start with a coarser abrasive to cut the top damaged layer off quickly, then progress to finer to finish it. I would think with TP it would be so fine that it would have a hard time cutting off the weather damaged top layer. But, all I know is the 3m kit worked. And for $10 or $15 it includes the buffing wheel that you use with a drill.
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On 05/12/2015 12:49 PM, Ashton Crusher wrote:

You gotta use Arm & Hammer with baking soda and peroxide :) I haven't had the need to clean up the headlights yet but I've used Meguiars plastic cleaner and polish on motorcycle helmet visors. I wonder if the polish or PlastiX used once a year or so as PM would work.
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try peanut butter instead.
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I've been thinking about that lately myself. In the past I've had good luck with Rain-X on lexan panels, but I haven't tried it on headlights. I'm curious about the buffing polish but the version I saw was ridiculously overpriced.
It sounds like Ashton is the only person here who's actually tried the polishing approach.
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I used a Harbor Freight on a 98 infiniti a few years ago. Worked slicker than snot on a doorknob.
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| | I used a Harbor Freight on a 98 infiniti a few years | ago. Worked slicker than snot on a doorknob.
That seems to be the name of a store. I've never heard of that store and I don't think there are any near me. (I also avoid shopping online, especially for things that I can probably buy down the street.) You don't remember the name of the product?
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It's easy enough to find on the HF website (item 65938, USD9.99)
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On Tuesday, May 12, 2015 at 10:46:38 AM UTC-4, Scott Lurndal wrote:

More importantly, just about everything at HF is their own stuff, branded for them, where you won't find anywhere else.
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On 5/12/2015 10:35 AM, Mayayana wrote:

It is Harbor Freight headlight restoration kit. Seems you are SOL.
Your local auto store will have something.
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| It is Harbor Freight headlight restoration kit. Seems you are SOL. |
OK. Thanks. At least I know now what he's talking about. :)
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Mayayana wrote:

Try to find a small container of 3M finesse-it , use with a terry cloth pad/buffing pad cover . Alternative is a Meguier's <sp?> wax/polish compound , has a very fine polishing compound in the wax . In a pinch I've used chrome polish ... these can all usually be found at your local auto parts store .
--
Snag



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On 5/12/2015 10:35 AM, Mayayana wrote:

headlamp lens restorer kit
http://www.harborfreight.com/12-minute-headlamp-lens-restorer-kit-65938.html
On sale, ten bucks.
- . Christopher A. Young learn more about Jesus . www.lds.org . .
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On 05/12/2015 03:10 PM, Stormin Mormon wrote:

Chinky junky?
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