Auto Brake question

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wrote:

Worthless cliche. If it is brake replacement time, it is just the pads that need to be replaced unless the car has symptoms of warped rotors. If the rotors are good, leave them the fuck alone. Replacing good components is insanity.
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On Sun, 17 Jan 2010 13:35:21 -0600, AZ Nomad

I agree with you IF the rotors are good. If there is wear you can see, feel, OR measure, they MAY NOT be "good componentsa"
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wrote:

Bad rotors aren't subtle. If they're bad, you'll feel the vibration.
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On Mon, 18 Jan 2010 08:36:19 -0600, AZ Nomad

Not always, by a long shot. Rotors can be worn so rough (grooved} that new pads would not have a 5% contact and you would not feel ANYTHING on the pedal to indicate there was anything wrong..
They can asl be so badly corroded that you only have a ring 1/2 inch wide where the pads are doing anything - with the OLD pads, and not have ANY vibration..
Brake pu;sation is not the ONLY reason brakes need replacing - and rotors too.
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I've had some experience with worn rotors. Like you write, sometimes the rotors groove, and then the pads don't make complete contact. And they can do that (incomplete contact) and still not be pu;sating.
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wrote:

When you replacing pads, you'll see the grooves. If there's no vibration and no visible grooving, then the rotors are fine.
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On Tue, 19 Jan 2010 10:28:08 -0600, AZ Nomad

Correct - or at least very close. - but what percentage of brake rotors, at service, have no visible grooving or pitting, and do not pulste or thump????? From my experience, which covers THOUSANDS of vehicles, the percentage is VERY low. I'd say on vehicles where the brakes have NOT worn to metal to metal, around here the numbers would definitely be 15% or less. Better than 30% have touched metal to metal on at least one wheel, which means BOTH sides need to be either refinished or replaced - so only 15% of 70%, or 10% of brake services would NOT have visible grooving or pitting, or be causing a thump by the time they came in for brake service.
In areas with no salt, the numbers would be higher.
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Red Green wrote:

There is a lesson to be learned from your story. First, the lowest price is not the best value.
You'd do far better by finding a good small shop, one that comes from recommendations, one that proves trustworthy over time, and stop shopping. Trust him, give him all your business, pay him promptly. .
The big chains are hit or miss. Some are good, others are on the sleazy side, all tend to be high priced and have a "replace everything" attitude.
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On 1/16/2010 22:24, Ed Pawlowski wrote:

But folks tend to love standardized big box places and chains because they are "their friends". Long story short I was out of town and had a C/V joint fail. I got off the pike and when I engaged the clutch nothing happened, I opened the hood and I could see the little stub shaft coming out of the transaxle hanging in the breeze. It gave no advance warning at all.
AAA towed me to a big mega chain place. While I was waiting I called back home to my evil small business mechanic who I trust and he described that it was a really straighforward job on my car (less than 1 hour) and they simply swapped out the complete assembly with a re-manufactured unit and that it was inexpensive because it was basically a commodity because the same one was used on numerous model years.
An hour later the "service manager" came over with his clipboard with the "computer analysis" and informed me that it was a 3 hour job and his $230 quote for the part was also excessive. I called two local to that area auto parts places while waiting and asked for the price on a complete C/V joint assembly. Both were less than $90.
I mentioned what I found and he told me they could only install their "certified parts". No choice since I was out of town I told them to do it. When I waited I could see that this was their SOP as they handled other customers.
While I waited a girl pulled up with a small pickup that had the name of one of the parts placed I called and she came to deliver the "certified parts" for my vehicle.
They only had a little window into the service shop but I watched as they quickly pulled out the old assembly and walked away and then returned two hours later to install the new assembly.
After a while the "service manager" came marching over with a serious look to tell me that they really needed to discuss something with me. They had the wheel off and showed me the normal wear pattern on the rotor and told me that was very dangerous and I shouldn't even drive the car. I played stupid and asked him to tell me more. He said that the rotor was "dangerously thin" and could shatter. I asked him to write it down and maybe draw a little sketch so I could better visualize it. He said he couldn't. Then I informed him that the specs for the minimum thickness were stamped on the edge of the rotor and that I wanted him to read the spec and get a caliper to measure the thickness to show me. If he wouldn't I would call the police and have them witness him doing it and I would press charges. He said , OK sir-if you will go to the waiting room we will put your car outside.
Why people love big boxes and chains I will never know.
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RBM wrote:

If the brake pedal isn't pulsing and depending on your driving habits..... If the drivers are an easy on the equipment type of drivers a new set of decent brake pads ought to get you at least 30-40K miles down the road and possibly twice that amount. If you or the driver are hard on brakes such as frequent long hard stops than put everything back to new car specs and that includes changing the brake fluid every two years. And did you know? A new set of pads needs to be properly "broken in". http://www.tirerack.com/brakes/tech/techpage.jsp?techid
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On Sun, 17 Jan 2010 06:48:18 -0600, FatterDumber& Happier Moe

which requires a proper surface preparation on the rotors.
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