Auto Brake question

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Is it customary to replace brake rotors when the pads wear down? I understand if the rotors have cracks in them, or the pads wore down to the rivets, they'd need to be replaced or at least turned. I still had some life left in the pads, but elected to replace them while I was in for an inspection, and they told me that they routinely replaced the rotors at the same time
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Well I always replace rotors!
But thats just me but heres why.
Rotors on newer vehicles arent very heavy, so generally shops recommend on turning them so they are straight and smooth. turning them costs money
But this maes them thinner and before you know it rotors warp and pulsate:(
So now you need new rotors anyway and pads again.
In my case its worse I carry extra weight in my van for my job.........
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snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

Then you should get a after market better replacement than OEM ones. The casted ones like old days. My brakes usually last at least 100K miles. Mostly driving on freeway.
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wrote:

maleable cast.. A straight cast iron rotor would shatter when it hids a puddle of ice water after hard breaking. I've seen it happen. (Rallye Mini Cooper in the early seventies)
Through-way driving is pretty easy on brakes compared to city and urban thoroughfare driving.
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snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

No doubt. My last brake job was done at 230K Km.
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RBM wrote:

It seems to be coming more routine. Rotor are made thinner and cheaper than in the past. If a rotor was getting grooved, it could be turned down. Today, there is barely enough to turn and they can be replaced for $25 on some cars.
If your rotors were in decent condition, you did right in leaving them alone. Some brake shops won't just replace pads. They insist on going a complete change of pads, rebuilding the calipers, etc. The reasoning is that they can then give a warranty on the entire job knowing that faulty parts were not missed and cause a problem in a few weeks. Far more expensive that just popping in a set of pads though.
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I agree, however, new pads will "seat" better if the rotors are turned or at least scuffed with some medium grade emery cloth to take the glaze off.
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wrote:

There reasoning is that they make a hell of a lot more money. Most people need nothing more then pads replaced on the first brake job. I'm had many cars with the original calipers still going strong past 125,000 miles. Most brake work is a scam to move money from your pocket to the shops pocket.
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True, you might only need pads, but if the don't turn the rotors (if they are thick enough) the pads will not seat and the brakes will not work like they are supposed to, therefore they will not give you a warranty.
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Ron wrote:

Never found seating to be a problem, but it probably can under the right conditions. OTOH, this may save you a few bucks if the brakes are pulsating.
http://www.stoptech.com/tech_info/wp_warped_brakedisk.shtml The obvious question now is "is there a "cure" for discs with uneven friction material deposits?" The answer is a conditional yes. If the vibration has just started, the chances are that the temperature has never reached the point where cementite begins to form. In this case, simply fitting a set of good "semi-metallic" pads and using them hard (after bedding) may well remove the deposits and restore the system to normal operation but with upgraded pads. If only a small amount of material has been transferred i.e. if the vibration is just starting, vigorous scrubbing with garnet paper may remove the deposit. As many deposits are not visible, scrub the entire friction surfaces thoroughly. Do not use regular sand paper or emery cloth as the aluminum oxide abrasive material will permeate the cast iron surface and make the condition worse. Do not bead blast or sand blast the discs for the same reason
Another cure that I've not tried, is a series of about hard stops from 60 to about 5 as hard and fast as you can. It is supposed to burn off any residue.
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So, you have brakes that are pulsating. And you're supposed to take them apart, put on a set of new semi-metalic pads, scrub with garnet paper, use them hard, etc. to try to fix it? Who in their right mind would do all that instead of just buying new rotors or turning the old ones? In my experience, a pulsating peddle is a WARPED rotor and none of that procedure is gonna solve it. Even if it might be capable of solving it, it's one hell of a lot more work than the obvious and correct solution. And when it doesn't work, you get to do it all over again.
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snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net wrote:

That's your mind. Many others seem to have a different mindset. This has been discussed frequently on auto groups and information is on various web site. A Google search will reveal many opinions of professional mechanics that differ from your thought.
In any case, new rotors will solve the problem.
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On Sun, 17 Jan 2010 06:32:08 -0800 (PST), snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net wrote:

rotors is extremely low compared to pitted or collapsed rotors when it comes to pulsations. The so-called "material transfer", or intergranular corrosion that makes high spots or hard spots on the rotors is much more common - as is the pitting that results when that high spot pops off.
This intergranular corrosion and hard spotting makes machining rotors an uncommon solution today, because generally by the time it gets to the shop that corrosion is SO DEEP that machining it out gets you below the machinability limit of the rotor.
If I was equipping a new automotive shop today I don't think I'd waste money on a disc lathe because there is no way it would EVER pay for itself under today's conditions. There was a time it was a definite money-maker and the ability to do it inhouse rather than using a jobber shop was a big plus.
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if the disc isn't grooved,then it doesn't need turning,and the new pads will "seat" just fine.

I've never seen disc rotors have "deposits" of friction material. generally,the pad material turns to dust.
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Jim Yanik
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FWIW, I have a 3/4 (or1) ton 2001 Dodge van company truck that I have had since new. At about 47K, the chirpers on the pads started making noise. I went to the parts house down the street from our shop, got a set of the best pads they had, about $50, put them on myself--did absolutely nothing but replace the pads. At about 97K, we were doing a routine inspection onthe truck, including pulling the wheels and checking the brakes. The pads still had probably 10-15K left on them, but our manager had a garage we use replace them and they turned the rotors at the same time. Truck has 125K on it now, still stopping fine, and still has the original shoes/drums in the rear. Larry
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On Sun, 17 Jan 2010 09:25:42 -0600, snipped-for-privacy@webtv.net (Lp1331 1p1331) wrote:

And yes, on a heavy duty vehicle this is more likely to happen than on a passenger vehicle or "light" truck.
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Clare, I am in San Antonio, so no salt and mostly fairly flat roads. For sure, 3/4-1 ton truck brake components are much heavier than modern cars, and even 1/2 ton trucks. The pads alone for mine are about 8" across and the lining itself is at least 5/" thick. I'm sure the rotors are thick and heavy. The company had bought a bunch of 1/2 ton Chevy and GMC vans before I started there--- I think they were 94-95's.They were junk. Besides shelling the rear ends out on every single one right out of warranty at between $800 to $1200, they did good to get 25K between brake jobs.FWIW, I probably get more mileage out of brakes than almost anyone there. I am the oldest one there. and am a pretty conservative driver. Now that I think about it, I have a friend who is about 70, and I am terrified to ride with him. He takes off from a stop just short of burnig rubber even if he is only going one block, then slams on the brakes just short of running a stop sign. His Lincoln Town Car gets --maybe -- 20K between brake jobs, not to mention probably half the gas mileage it should get. So, how a person drives has as much to do with brake wear as the quality of the brakes. Larry
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Lp1331 1p1331 wrote:

Not to mention where you live. When I lived in Philadelphia, I'd get 25,000 miles from a set of pad. Where I am now, I just traded in my '07 with 67,000 miles and the brakes were in very good condition, close to half the pad left. I put on more miles per y ear, but hit the brakes much less. Instead of a stop sign at every corner, I can drive home 25 miles and hit the brakes two or three times.
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Ed Pawlowski wrote:

yeah, I never actually wore out a set of brakes before I moved to DC-land. Before that, I'd do a brake job when I bought a "new used" car and they'd last until the car wore out or I got sick of it.
nate
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On Sun, 17 Jan 2010 21:14:14 -0600, snipped-for-privacy@webtv.net (Lp1331 1p1331) wrote:

San Antonio is likely one of the best places to live for brake life. You have no road salt and relatively low humidity, so corrosion is not a big concern, and you are not a "large municipal region" like the LA basin, so have less Urban Gridlock. Much of your driving would be relatively open road, except during rush-hour. (comparing to, say, the wachington DC area, NYC, Toronto, or Montreal or even Vancouver - or Dallas/ft Worth) - and like you say - FLAT - kinda like Saskatchewan - where you can watch your dog running away for a week.
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