Attic Fans

This house didn't come with one. Stupid really, considering the climate. I've never had to search for one before but I am doing so now. What I'm looking to find is some testimonials on reliability and *_quietness_ from those of you who have them. It needs to be one big enough to suck the air out from @ 1400 sq.ft.
*Quietness is a huge factor. We find loud dishwashers and such extremely irritating as it is. Recommendations,brands,tips etc., are very much appreciated.
Terri
--
Hanging is too good for a man who makes puns;
he should be drawn and quoted.
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First thing, what you're looking for is a "whole house fan". An attic fan typically mounts in the gable and ventilates the attic.
You'll want a low speed belt driven fan. These fans are also known as "chicken house fans" because that is a major use.
I selected a Dayton brand (Graingers) fan for my house. Like you, I detest fan noise. Multi-speed motors are available but I chose a different option. I ordered the fan without a motor. I purchased a 1/2hp 90 volt DC motor. This is a very common industrial motor and is only a little more expensive than the AC equivalent. These are also widely available surplus. The speed varies directly with the input voltage.
I installed 2 bridge rectifiers on the motor case, one for the armature and one for the field. Down in the house I installed a 2 gang electrical box. In one side I installed a spring-wound 24 hour timer and in the other I installed a motor-compatible light dimmer. Overhead fan speed controls will also work. I connected the field bridge rectifier to the 120vac coming out of the timer. I connected the armature bridge to the speed control.
When the timer is set the motor field is energized. When the speed control is dialed up, the motor runs at the speed called for.
Nowadays permanent magnet field motors are commonly available which eliminates the field bridge and wiring.
This is very nice. I can set the speed to slow and enjoy a silent and gentle breeze. Or I can dial it wide open and suck the paint off the walls :-) This is particularly handy when there is a "cooking malfunction" in the kitchen.
While you're ordering the fan, get some quality louvers too. Avoid the cheap aluminum ones that the big box stores sell unless you like to listen to rattling. I got mine from Graingers.
John
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John De Armond
See my website for my current email address
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Lasko's 2155A 2470 90 W window fan is nice--$53 from Ace Hardware. For summer use, in an upstairs window behind some homemade poly film louvers hinged at the top that only allow exhaust airflow, with more louvers inside a downstairs window that only allow intake airflow. Turn off the AC (if any) and turn on the the fan when outdoor air is cooler using a Goldline differential thermostat from Grainger in series with a room temp thermostat to turn it off when the room air becomes too cool.
And maybe cool a basement with lots of thermal mass below the comfort temp at night and turn on another fan during the day to circulate air between the basement and living space as needed to keep it cool with no ventilation to the outdoors.
For winter use, reverse the louvers and fan and add humidity controls to turn off the furnace and turn on the fan to warm and dehumidify the house and avoid condensation on a warm day.
Some day soon, we may see a computer that does all this with an adaptive algorithm and wireless Sensiron RH/temp sensors and X10/Insteon controls.
Nick
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snipped-for-privacy@ece.villanova.edu wrote in looks for:

temp
ventilation
Whoops. I guess I should have mentioned I'm now in S.Louisiana! (Transplanted Idahoan.) Any hole in the ground results in a pool, not a basement.

house
Although winter is only about 2 months long here, that's also the dry period, if you can call it "dry", that is. Thank you for the information,though. Terri
--
Hanging is too good for a man who makes puns;
he should be drawn and quoted.
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