Attaching patio cover to house

I want to build a patio cover (slanted roof) over my patio. What would be the best way to attach the rafters to the side of my house? I have Hardi-Plank siding on my house and studs directly behind the HardiPlank. I'd obviously remove the HardiPlank that is in the way and attach the rafters to the studs. But how?
Should I do something like bolt/nail a board horizontally across the studs and then attach my rafters to that? I'm not an expert carpenter but once I get this part figured out I know enough to handle the rest of the project. I just want to make sure that it is attached well to the house but not overkill, either.
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DIY here. Make a sketch and visit your building/permit department. They gave me all the information we needed. I helped a friend build mine. Get a permit, if required. Plenty of things must be taken into account. Roof pitch, roofing type (my is tile), pad depth for columns, electrical, ledger/beam size, etc.
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Typically this is done by lag bolting a ledger through the siding into the studs.
Depending on local code requirements & the patio rafter span.....1/2 or 5/8" lags normally will do the trick.
Stagger the bolt pattern; high / low. A 2x6 or 2x8 header should do the trick; depending on your design.
If you measure or other locate the studs, careful layout of the ledger will allow you to pre-drill it & hit the studs dead on.
If your patio cover (actually a low slope roof?) is solid...consider the pitch needed & the effect on header height at the edge of the patio.
cheers Bob
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wrote:

Chuckle.. They sent the tallest inspector in the office, I guess :)
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I
If you get a lot of snow, consider the load the roof will need to support, and where the next support is.
I did a similar project over an 8 foot section of my deck in Portland, OR. The intent was to allow me to grill during winter. No snow load considerations to speak of, so I user a ledger board on the wall (attached with lag screws). The roofed area was 8' X 8', using 2 X 6 "joists" the length of the run. I used the corrugated translucent fiberglass type roofing to maximize light and reduce weight. I didn't even consider a permit.
At the wall, I caulked all along the ledger board, but also flashed above the ledger from the bottom side of the next lap of siding up. So effectively there was an original roof overhang, then the flashing which curved out over the first few inches of my roof material. It remained very watertight in the 3 years I stayed there after the project.
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