attaching oak nosing to tiled counter top

I would like recomendations for the best way to attach an oak nosing (oak chair rail with the top 1/2" or so ripped off, so just the large rounded bead is now on top) to a ceramic tiled counter top. The counter top consists of 5/8 underlayment - 1/2 durarock - 3/8" ceramic tile. My thoughts are to glue the back of the nosing (best glue??? liquid nails? silicone? or other?) and finish nail trying to make sure the nails hit the underlayment without splitting it. Would you suggest to toenail two finish nails in opposite directions close to each other? or would just straight in do the trick? This counter top is in a kitchen. I have not stained or finished the back side of the chair rail as of yet. Should I atleast put a clear coat on the back to prevent any water damage or would that lessen the holding power of the adhesive? I am using marine spar varnish as my clear coat. Any thoughts or suggestions would be greatly appreciated.
Mickey
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Mickey wrote:

Aliphatic (yellow) wood worker's glue. Strong, easy to vlean off while wet. Type 2 is "water resistent", would be water proof for all intents. _________________________

You should drill pilot holes so you are *sure* of hitting the underlayment which I assume is particle board. If it is, drill it too...just make the pilot hole a smidge smaller in diameter than the nails. If I were using nails (I wouldn't, I'd use screws) I'd nail about every 8" alternating the angle. _________________________

If you glue, don't finish the back _________________________

I assume the top overhangs the face frame or cabinet edges? If so - and if it were me - I'd add some 3/4 thick wood under the underlayment by glueing/screwing up into the underlayment. That would give me a thicker edge which would hold fasteners (screws) much better than the 5/8 particle board and which isn't susceptible to splitting.
-- dadiOH _____________________________
dadiOH's dandies v3.0... ...a help file of info about MP3s, recording from LP/cassette and tips & tricks on this and that. Get it at http://mysite.verizon.net/xico ____________________________
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I think the latest edition of "Home Handyman" has an article about how to do this (with pictures).

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glued biscuits. use a slot cutter. btw: eventually it will turn black due to water getting to the oak, especially if you use anything with iron in it as fasteners. since you can't finish the back if it's going to be glued, there will be water intrusion hastening this look.
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I do not have a biscuit cutter and even if I did I am not sure how I would line up the slots to get a flush fit. I can put a clear coat on the back of the oak before it is installed. Would you recommend that?? I will look for stainless or galvanized nails. Thanks for the point about the iron nails.
Thank You Charles
Mickey
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you can get a cheap biscuit cutter at HF, or you can probably rent one.
the b.c. has a fence to line up the slots correctly.
if you clearcoat the back, you can't use any glue to attach it. the glue actually sinks into the wood, making a stronger bond.
if you have access to a tablesaw and a router, you could cut a slot in the edge of the counter, and mill the back of the edging into a T shape to fit the slot.
i'd not use nails. i'd use countersunk brass or steel screws, and fill the holes with plugs. you can buy plugs to match the wood you're using at woodworking stores or online, or can make them from scrap wood if you buy a plug cutter. you can even use contrasting wood plugs to make an interesting effect, sort of like the deck of a boat.
try asking in rec.woodworking. there might be someone near you who can produce this for you, if you go with custom made edging.

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I had the exact same set up you re trying to do. I used 2" finishing nails and Titebond II yellow glue. I made sure there was a narrow space for a groutline between the oak and the countertop tile. The assistant (wife) grouted and used 3 coats of grout sealer. Put a waterbased Behr transparent stain on the oak after a coat of Behr wood conditioner. Then 3 coats of poly. Never had a water problem but just 2 adults using the kitchen.. & No "Ducks"
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